browse words by letter
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
adj

more about adj

adj


  1  definition  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Out  \Out\,  adv  [OE.  out  ut  oute,  ute,  AS  [=u]t,  and  [=u]te, 
  [=u]tan,  fr  [=u]t;  akin  to  D.  uit,  OS  [=u]t,  G.  aus,  OHG. 
  [=u]z,  Icel.  [=u]t,  Sw  ut  Dan.  ud  Goth.  ut  Skr.  ud 
  [root]198.  Cf  {About},  {But},  prep.,  {Carouse},  {Utter},  a.] 
  In  its  original  and  strict  sense  out  means  from  the  interior 
  of  something  beyond  the  limits  or  boundary  of  somethings;  in 
  a  position  or  relation  which  is  exterior  to  something  -- 
  opposed  to  {in}  or  {into}.  The  something  may  be  expressed 
  after  of  from  etc  (see  {Out  of},  below);  or  if  not 
  expressed,  it  is  implied;  as  he  is  out  or  he  is  out  of  the 
  house,  office,  business,  etc.;  he  came  out  or  he  came  out 
  from  the  ship,  meeting,  sect,  party,  etc  Out  is  used  in  a 
  variety  of  applications,  as: 
 
  1.  Away  abroad;  off  from  home,  or  from  a  certain,  or  a 
  usual,  place  not  in  not  in  a  particular,  or  a  usual, 
  place  as  the  proprietor  is  out  his  team  was  taken  out 
  ``My  shoulder  blade  is  out.''  --Shak. 
 
  He  hath  been  out  (of  the  country)  nine  years. 
  --Shak. 
 
  2.  Beyond  the  limits  of  concealment,  confinement,  privacy, 
  constraint,  etc.,  actual  of  figurative;  hence  not  in 
  concealment,  constraint,  etc.,  in  or  into  a  state  of 
  freedom,  openness,  disclosure,  publicity,  etc.;  as  the 
  sun  shines  out  he  laughed  out  to  be  out  at  the  elbows; 
  the  secret  has  leaked  out  or  is  out  the  disease  broke 
  out  on  his  face;  the  book  is  out 
 
  Leaves  are  out  and  perfect  in  a  month.  --Bacon. 
 
  She  has  not  been  out  [in  general  society]  very  long. 
  --H.  James. 
 
  3.  Beyond  the  limit  of  existence,  continuance,  or  supply;  to 
  the  end  completely;  hence  in  or  into  a  condition  of 
  extinction,  exhaustion,  completion;  as  the  fuel,  or  the 
  fire,  has  burned  out  ``Hear  me  out.''  --Dryden. 
 
  Deceitiful  men  shall  not  live  out  half  their  days. 
  --Ps.  iv  23. 
 
  When  the  butt  is  out  we  will  drink  water.  --Shak. 
 
  4.  Beyond  possession,  control,  or  occupation;  hence  in  or 
  into  a  state  of  want  loss  or  deprivation;  --  used  of 
  office,  business,  property,  knowledge,  etc.;  as  the 
  Democrats  went  out  and  the  Whigs  came  in  he  put  his  money 
  out  at  interest.  ``Land  that  is  out  at  rack  rent.'' 
  --Locke.  ``He  was  out  fifty  pounds.''  --Bp.  Fell. 
 
  I  have  forgot  my  part  and  I  am  out  --Shak. 
 
  5.  Beyond  the  bounds  of  what  is  true,  reasonable,  correct, 
  proper,  common,  etc.;  in  error  or  mistake;  in  a  wrong  or 
  incorrect  position  or  opinion;  in  a  state  of  disagreement, 
  opposition,  etc.;  in  an  inharmonious  relation.  ``Lancelot 
  and  I  are  out.''  --Shak. 
 
  Wicked  men  are  strangely  out  in  the  calculating  of 
  their  own  interest.  --South. 
 
  Very  seldom  out  in  these  his  guesses.  --Addison. 
 
  6.  Not  in  the  position  to  score  in  playing  a  game;  not  in  the 
  state  or  turn  of  the  play  for  counting  or  gaining  scores. 
 
  Note:  Out  is  largely  used  in  composition  as  a  prefix,  with 
  the  same  significations  that  it  has  as  a  separate  word 
  as  outbound,  outbreak,  outbuilding,  outcome,  outdo, 
  outdoor,  outfield.  See  also  the  first  Note  under 
  {Over},  adv 
 
  {Day  in  day  out},  from  the  beginning  to  the  limit  of  each  of 
  several  days;  day  by  day  every  day 
 
  {Out  and  out}. 
  a  adv  Completely;  wholly;  openly. 
  b  adj  Without  any  reservation  or  disguise;  absolute; 
  as  an  out  and  out  villain.  [As  an  {adj}.  written  also 
  {out-and-out}.] 
 
  {Out  at},  {Out  in},  {Out  on},  etc.,  elliptical  phrases,  that 
  to  which  out  refers  as  a  source,  origin,  etc.,  being 
  omitted;  as  out  (of  the  house  and)  at  the  barn;  out  (of 
  the  house,  road,  fields,  etc.,  and)  in  the  woods. 
 
  Three  fishers  went  sailing  out  into  the  west,  Out 
  into  the  west,  as  the  sun  went  down  --C.  Kingsley. 
 
  Note:  In  these  lines  after  out  may  be  understood,  ``of  the 
  harbor,''  ``from  the  shore,''  ``of  sight,''  or  some 
  similar  phrase.  The  complete  construction  is  seen  in 
  the  saying:  ``Out  of  the  frying  pan  into  the  fire.'' 
 
  {Out  from},  a  construction  similar  to  {out  of}  (below).  See 
  {Of}  and  {From}. 
 
  {Out  of},  a  phrase  which  may  be  considered  either  as  composed 
  of  an  adverb  and  a  preposition,  each  having  its 
  appropriate  office  in  the  sentence,  or  as  a  compound 
  preposition.  Considered  as  a  preposition,  it  denotes,  with 
  verbs  of  movement  or  action  from  the  interior  of  beyond 
  the  limit:  from  hence  origin,  source,  motive,  departure, 
  separation,  loss  etc.;  --  opposed  to  {in}  or  {into};  also 
  with  verbs  of  being  the  state  of  being  derived,  removed, 
  or  separated  from  Examples  may  be  found  in  the  phrases 
  below,  and  also  under  Vocabulary  words  as  out  of  breath; 
  out  of  countenance. 
 
  {Out  of  cess},  beyond  measure,  excessively.  --Shak. 
 
  {Out  of  character},  unbecoming;  improper. 
 
  {Out  of  conceit  with},  not  pleased  with  See  under  {Conceit}. 
 
 
  {Out  of  date},  not  timely;  unfashionable;  antiquated. 
 
  {Out  of  door},  {Out  of  doors},  beyond  the  doors;  from  the 
  house;  in  or  into  the  open  air;  hence  figuratively, 
  shut  out  dismissed.  See  under  {Door},  also 
  {Out-of-door},  {Outdoor},  {Outdoors},  in  the  Vocabulary. 
  ``He  's  quality,  and  the  question's  out  of  door,'' 
  --Dryden. 
 
  {Out  of  favor},  disliked;  under  displeasure. 
 
  {Out  of  frame},  not  in  correct  order  or  condition;  irregular; 
  disarranged.  --Latimer. 
 
  {Out  of  hand},  immediately;  without  delay  or  preparation. 
  ``Ananias  .  .  .  fell  down  and  died  out  of  hand.'' 
  --Latimer. 




more about adj