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advent

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advent


  5  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Advent  \Ad`vent\,  n.  [L.  adventus  fr  advenire  adventum:  cf 
  F.  avent.  See  {Advene}.] 
  1.  (Eccl.)  The  period  including  the  four  Sundays  before 
  Christmas. 
 
  {Advent  Sunday}  (Eccl.),  the  first  Sunday  in  the  season  of 
  Advent,  being  always  the  nearest  Sunday  to  the  feast  of 
  St  Andrew  (Now.  30).  --Shipley. 
 
  2.  The  first  or  the  expected  second  coming  of  Christ. 
 
  3.  Coming;  any  important  arrival;  approach. 
 
  Death's  dreadful  advent.  --Young. 
 
  Expecting  still  his  advent  home.  --Tennyson. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  advent 
  n  1:  esp.  of  something  momentous;  "the  advent  of  the  computer" 
  [syn:  {coming}] 
  2:  the  season  including  the  four  Sundays  preceding  Christmas 
  [syn:  {Advent}] 
  3:  (Christian  theology)  the  reappearance  of  Jesus  as  judge  for 
  the  Last  Judgment  [syn:  {Second  Coming},  {Second  Advent}, 
  {Advent}] 
 
  From  U.S.  Gazetteer  (1990)  [gazetteer]: 
 
  Advent,  WV 
  Zip  code(s):  25231 
 
  From  Jargon  File  (4.2.3,  23  NOV  2000)  [jargon]: 
 
  ADVENT  /ad'vent/  n.  The  prototypical  computer  adventure  game, 
  first  designed  by  Will  Crowther  on  the  {PDP-10}  in  the  mid-1970s  as 
  an  attempt  at  computer-refereed  fantasy  gaming,  and  expanded  into  a 
  puzzle-oriented  game  by  Don  Woods  at  Stanford  in  1976.  (Woods  had  been 
  one  of  the  authors  of  {INTERCAL}.)  Now  better  known  as  Adventure  or 
  Colossal  Cave  Adventure,  but  the  {{TOPS-10}}  operating  system  permitted 
  only  six-letter  filenames  See  also  {vadding},  {Zork},  and  {Infocom}. 
 
  This  game  defined  the  terse,  dryly  humorous  style  since  expected  in 
  text  adventure  games,  and  popularized  several  tag  lines  that  have 
  become  fixtures  of  hacker-speak:  "A  huge  green  fierce  snake  bars  the  way!" 
  "I  see  no  X  here"  (for  some  noun  X).  "You  are  in  a  maze  of  twisty  little 
  passages,  all  alike."  "You  are  in  a  little  maze  of  twisty  passages, 
  all  different."  The  `magic  words'  {xyzzy}  and  {plugh}  also  derive  from 
  this  game. 
 
  Crowther  by  the  way  participated  in  the  exploration  of  the 
  Mammoth  &  Flint  Ridge  cave  system;  it  actually  _has_  a  `Colossal  Cave' 
  and  a  `Bedquilt'  as  in  the  game,  and  the  `Y2'  that  also  turns  up  is 
  cavers'  jargon  for  a  map  reference  to  a  secondary  entrance. 
 
  ADVENT  sources  are  available  for  FTP  at 
  `ftp://ftp.wustl.edu/doc/misc/if-archive/games/source/advent.tar.Z'. 
  There  is  a  Colossal  Cave  Adventure  page 
  (http://people.delphi.com/rickadams/adventure/index.html). 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  ADVENT 
 
    /ad'vent/  The  prototypical  computer  {Adventure}  game, 
  first  implemented  by  Will  Crowther  for  a  {CDC}  computer 
  (probably  the  6600?)  as  an  attempt  at  computer-refereed 
  fantasy  gaming. 
 
  ADVENT  was  ported  to  the  {PDP-10},  and  expanded  to  the 
  350-point  {Classic}  puzzle-oriented  version,  by  Don  Woods  of 
  the  {Stanford  Artificial  Intelligence  Laboratory}  (SAIL).  The 
  game  is  now  better  known  as  Adventure,  but  the  {TOPS-10} 
  {operating  system}  permitted  only  six-letter  filenames  All 
  the  versions  since  are  based  on  the  SAIL  port. 
 
  David  Long  of  the  {University  of  Chicago}  Graduate  School  of 
  Business  Computing  Facility  (which  had  two  of  the  four 
  {DEC20}s  on  campus  in  the  late  1970s  and  early  1980s)  was 
  responsible  for  expanding  the  cave  in  a  number  of  ways,  and 
  pushing  the  point  count  up  to  500,  then  501  points.  Most  of 
  his  work  was  in  the  data  files,  but  he  made  some  changes  to 
  the  {parser}  as  well 
 
  This  game  defined  the  terse,  dryly  humorous  style  now  expected 
  in  text  adventure  games,  and  popularised  several  tag  lines 
  that  have  become  fixtures  of  hacker-speak:  "A  huge  green 
  fierce  snake  bars  the  way!"  "I  see  no  X  here"  (for  some  noun 
  X).  "You  are  in  a  maze  of  twisty  little  passages,  all  alike." 
  "You  are  in  a  little  maze  of  twisty  passages,  all  different." 
  The  "magic  words"  {xyzzy}  and  {plugh}  also  derive  from  this 
  game. 
 
  Crowther  by  the  way  participated  in  the  exploration  of  the 
  Mammoth  &  Flint  Ridge  cave  system;  it  actually  *has*  a 
  "Colossal  Cave"  and  a  Bedquilt"  as  in  the  game,  and  the  "Y2" 
  that  also  turns  up  is  cavers'  jargon  for  a  map  reference  to  a 
  secondary  entrance. 
 
  See  also  {vadding}. 
 
  [Was  the  original  written  in  Fortran?] 
 
  [{Jargon  File}] 
 
  (1996-04-01) 
 
 




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