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alias

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alias


  5  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Alias  \A"li*as\,  adv  [L.,  fr  alius.  See  {Else}.]  (Law) 
  a  Otherwise;  otherwise  called  --  a  term  used  in  legal 
  proceedings  to  connect  the  different  names  of  any  one  who 
  has  gone  by  two  or  more  and  whose  true  name  is  for  any 
  cause  doubtful;  as  Smith,  alias  Simpson. 
  b  At  another  time. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Alias  \A"li*as\,  n.;  pl  {Aliases}.  [L.,  otherwise,  at  another 
  time.]  (Law) 
  a  A  second  or  further  writ  which  is  issued  after  a  first 
  writ  has  expired  without  effect. 
  b  Another  name  an  assumed  name 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  alias 
  n  :  a  name  that  has  been  assumed  temporarily  [syn:  {assumed  name}, 
  {false  name}] 
  adv  :  as  known  or  named  at  another  time  or  place  "Mr.  Smith, 
  alias  Mr  Lafayette"  [syn:  {a.k.a.},  {also  known  as}] 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  ALIAS 
 
  {ALgorIthmic  ASsembly  language} 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  alias 
 
  1.    A  name  usually  short  and  easy  to 
  remember  and  type  that  is  translated  into  another  name  or 
  string,  usually  long  and  difficult  to  remember  or  type  Most 
  {command  interpreters}  (e.g.  {Unix}'s  {csh})  allow  the  user  to 
  define  aliases  for  commands,  e.g.  "alias  l  ls  -al".  These  are 
  loaded  into  memory  when  the  interpreter  starts  and  are 
  expanded  without  needing  to  refer  to  any  file. 
 
  2.    One  of  several  alternative  {hostnames}  with 
  the  same  {Internet  address}.  E.g.  in  the  {Unix}  {hosts} 
  database  (/etc/hosts  or  {NIS}  map)  the  first  field  on  a  line 
  is  the  {Internet  address},  the  next  is  the  official  hostname 
  (the  "{canonical}  name"  or  "{CNAME}")  and  any  others  are 
  aliases. 
 
  Hostname  aliases  often  indicate  that  the  host  with  that  alias 
  provides  a  particular  network  service  such  as  {archie}, 
  {finger},  {FTP},  or  {World-Wide  Web}.  The  assignment  of 
  services  to  computers  can  then  be  changed  simply  by  moving  an 
  alias  (e.g.  www.doc.ic.ac.uk)  from  one  {Internet  address}  to 
  another,  without  the  clients  needing  to  be  aware  of  the 
  change. 
 
  3.    The  name  used  by  {Apple  computer,  Inc.}  for 
  {symbolic  links}  when  they  added  them  to  the  {System  7} 
  {operating  system}  in  1991. 
 
  (1997-10-22) 
 
 




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