browse words by letter
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
bath

more about bath

bath


  7  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Bath  \Bath\  (b[.a]th;  61),  n.;  pl  {Baths}  (b[.a]thz).  [AS. 
  b[ae][eth];  akin  to  OS  &  Icel.  ba[eth],  Sw.,  Dan.,  D.,  &  G. 
  bad  and  perh.  to  G.  b["a]hen  to  foment.] 
  1.  The  act  of  exposing  the  body,  or  part  of  the  body,  for 
  purposes  of  cleanliness,  comfort,  health,  etc.,  to  water, 
  vapor,  hot  air,  or  the  like  as  a  cold  or  a  hot  bath;  a 
  medicated  bath;  a  steam  bath;  a  hip  bath. 
 
  2.  Water  or  other  liquid  for  bathing. 
 
  3.  A  receptacle  or  place  where  persons  may  immerse  or  wash 
  their  bodies  in  water. 
 
  4.  A  building  containing  an  apartment  or  a  series  of 
  apartments  arranged  for  bathing. 
 
  Among  the  ancients,  the  public  baths  were  of  amazing 
  extent  and  magnificence.  --Gwilt. 
 
  5.  (Chem.)  A  medium,  as  heated  sand,  ashes,  steam,  hot  air, 
  through  which  heat  is  applied  to  a  body. 
 
  6.  (Photog.)  A  solution  in  which  plates  or  prints  are 
  immersed;  also  the  receptacle  holding  the  solution. 
 
  Note:  Bath  is  used  adjectively  or  in  combination,  in  an 
  obvious  sense  of  or  for  baths  or  bathing;  as  bathroom, 
  bath  tub,  bath  keeper. 
 
  {Douche  bath}.  See  {Douche}. 
 
  {Order  of  the  Bath},  a  high  order  of  British  knighthood, 
  composed  of  three  classes,  viz.,  knights  grand  cross, 
  knights  commanders,  and  knights  companions,  abbreviated 
  thus:  G.  C.  B.,  K.  C.  B.,  K.  B. 
 
  {Russian  bath},  a  kind  of  vapor  bath  which  consists  in  a 
  prolonged  exposure  of  the  body  to  the  influence  of  the 
  steam  of  water,  followed  by  washings  and  shampooings 
 
  {Turkish  bath},  a  kind  of  bath  in  which  a  profuse 
  perspiration  is  produced  by  hot  air,  after  which  the  body 
  is  washed  and  shampooed. 
 
  {Bath  house},  a  house  used  for  the  purpose  of  bathing;  -- 
  also  a  small  house,  near  a  bathing  place  where  a  bather 
  undresses  and  dresses. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Bath  \Bath\,  n. 
  A  city  in  the  west  of  England,  resorted  to  for  its  hot 
  springs,  which  has  given  its  name  to  various  objects. 
 
  {Bath  brick},  a  preparation  of  calcareous  earth,  in  the  form 
  of  a  brick,  used  for  cleaning  knives,  polished  metal,  etc 
 
 
  {Bath  chair},  a  kind  of  chair  on  wheels,  as  used  by  invalids 
  at  Bath.  ``People  walked  out  or  drove  out  or  were  pushed 
  out  in  their  Bath  chairs.''  --Dickens. 
 
  {Bath  metal},  an  alloy  consisting  of  four  and  a  half  ounces 
  of  zinc  and  one  pound  of  copper. 
 
  {Bath  note},  a  folded  writing  paper,  8  1/2  by  14  inches. 
 
  {Bath  stone},  a  species  of  limestone  (o["o]lite)  found  near 
  Bath,  used  for  building. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Bath  \Bath\,  n.  [Heb.] 
  A  Hebrew  measure  containing  the  tenth  of  a  homer,  or  five 
  gallons  and  three  pints,  as  a  measure  for  liquids;  and  two 
  pecks  and  five  quarts,  as  a  dry  measure. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  bath 
  n  1:  a  vessel  in  which  something  is  immersed  to  maintain  it  at  a 
  constant  temperature  or  to  process  or  lubricate  it 
  2:  you  soak  your  body  in  a  bathtub;  "he  has  a  good  bath  every 
  morning" 
  3:  a  relatively  large  open  container  that  you  fill  with  water 
  and  use  to  wash  the  body  [syn:  {bathtub},  {tub}] 
  4:  an  ancient  Hebrew  liquid  measure  equal  to  about  10  gallons 
  5:  a  room  (in  a  residence)  containing  a  bath  or  shower  and 
  usually  a  washbasin  and  toilet  [syn:  {bathroom}] 
  v  :  clean  one's  body  by  immersion  into  water;  "The  child  should 
  take  a  bath  every  day"  [syn:  {bathe}] 
 
  From  U.S.  Gazetteer  (1990)  [gazetteer]: 
 
  Bath,  IL  (village,  FIPS  4156) 
  Location:  40.19113  N,  90.14238  W 
  Population  (1990):  388  (216  housing  units) 
  Area:  0.9  sq  km  (land),  0.0  sq  km  (water) 
  Bath,  IN 
  Zip  code(s):  47010 
  Bath,  ME  (city,  FIPS  3355) 
  Location:  43.93807  N,  69.83742  W 
  Population  (1990):  9799  (4236  housing  units) 
  Area:  23.7  sq  km  (land),  10.6  sq  km  (water) 
  Zip  code(s):  04530 
  Bath,  MI 
  Zip  code(s):  48808 
  Bath,  NC  (town,  FIPS  3840) 
  Location:  35.46541  N,  76.81506  W 
  Population  (1990):  154  (108  housing  units) 
  Area:  0.8  sq  km  (land),  1.6  sq  km  (water) 
  Zip  code(s):  27808 
  Bath,  NH 
  Zip  code(s):  03740 
  Bath,  NY  (village,  FIPS  4759) 
  Location:  42.33700  N,  77.31843  W 
  Population  (1990):  5801  (2640  housing  units) 
  Area:  7.5  sq  km  (land),  0.0  sq  km  (water) 
  Bath,  PA  (borough,  FIPS  4432) 
  Location:  40.72758  N,  75.39179  W 
  Population  (1990):  2358  (914  housing  units) 
  Area:  2.3  sq  km  (land),  0.0  sq  km  (water) 
  Zip  code(s):  18014 
  Bath,  SD 
  Zip  code(s):  57427 
 
  From  Easton's  1897  Bible  Dictionary  [easton]: 
 
  Bath 
  a  Hebrew  liquid  measure,  the  tenth  part  of  an  homer  (1  Kings 
  7:26,  38;  Ezek.  45:10,  14).  It  contained  8  gallons  3  quarts  of 
  our  measure.  "Ten  acres  of  vineyard  shall  yield  one  bath"  (Isa. 
  5:10)  denotes  great  unproductiveness. 
 
 
  From  THE  DEVIL'S  DICTIONARY  ((C)1911  Released  April  15  1993)  [devils]: 
 
  BATH,  n.  A  kind  of  mystic  ceremony  substituted  for  religious  worship, 
  with  what  spiritual  efficacy  has  not  been  determined. 
 
  The  man  who  taketh  a  steam  bath 
  He  loseth  all  the  skin  he  hath, 
  And  for  he's  boiled  a  brilliant  red, 
  Thinketh  to  cleanliness  he's  wed, 
  Forgetting  that  his  lungs  he's  soiling 
  With  dirty  vapors  of  the  boiling. 
  Richard  Gwow 
 
 




more about bath