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batten

more about batten

batten


  7  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
 
 
  3.  The  movable  swing  frame  of  a  loom,  carrying  the  reed  for 
  separating  the  warp  threads  and  beating  up  the  weft;  -- 
  called  also  {lay}  and  {batten}. 
 
  {Blanchard  lathe},  a  lathe  for  turning  irregular  forms  after 
  a  given  pattern,  as  lasts,  gunstocks,  and  the  like 
 
  {Drill  lathe},  or  {Speed  lathe},  a  small  lathe  which  from 
  its  high  speed,  is  adapted  for  drilling;  a  hand  lathe. 
 
  {Engine  lathe},  a  turning  lathe  in  which  the  cutting  tool  has 
  an  automatic  feed;  --  used  chiefly  for  turning  and  boring 
  metals,  cutting  screws,  etc 
 
  {Foot  lathe},  a  lathe  which  is  driven  by  a  treadle  worked  by 
  the  foot. 
 
  {Geometric  lathe}.  See  under  {Geometric} 
 
  {Hand  lathe},  a  lathe  operated  by  hand;  a  power  turning  lathe 
  without  an  automatic  feed  for  the  tool. 
 
  {Slide  lathe},  an  engine  lathe. 
 
  {Throw  lathe},  a  small  lathe  worked  by  one  hand,  while  the 
  cutting  tool  is  held  in  the  other 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Batten  \Bat"ten\,  v.  t. 
  To  furnish  or  fasten  with  battens. 
 
  {To  batten  down},  to  fasten  down  with  battens,  as  the 
  tarpaulin  over  the  hatches  of  a  ship  during  a  storm. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Batten  \Bat"ten\,  n.  [F.  battant  See  {Batter},  v.  t.] 
  The  movable  bar  of  a  loom,  which  strikes  home  or  closes  the 
  threads  of  a  woof. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Batten  \Bat"ten\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Battened}  (?);  p.  pr  & 
  vb  n.  {Battening}.]  [See  {Batful}.] 
  1.  To  make  fat  by  plenteous  feeding;  to  fatten.  ``Battening 
  our  flocks.''  --Milton. 
 
  2.  To  fertilize  or  enrich,  as  land. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Batten  \Bat"ten\,  v.  i. 
  To  grow  fat;  to  grow  fat  in  ease  and  luxury;  to  glut  one's 
  self  --Dryden. 
 
  The  pampered  monarch  lay  battening  in  ease.  --Garth. 
 
  Skeptics,  with  a  taste  for  carrion,  who  batten  on  the 
  hideous  facts  in  history,  --  persecutions, 
  inquisitions.  --Emerson. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Batten  \Bat"ten\,  n  .  [F.  b?ton  stick,  staff.  See  {Baton}.] 
  A  strip  of  sawed  stuff,  or  a  scantling;  as 
  a  pl  (Com.  &  Arch.)  Sawed  timbers  about  7  by  2  1/2  inches 
  and  not  less  than  6  feet  long.  --Brande  &  C. 
  b  (Naut.)  A  strip  of  wood  used  in  fastening  the  edges  of  a 
  tarpaulin  to  the  deck,  also  around  masts  to  prevent 
  chafing. 
  c  A  long,  thin  strip  used  to  strengthen  a  part  to  cover  a 
  crack,  etc 
 
  {Batten  door}  (Arch.),  a  door  made  of  boards  of  the  whole 
  length  of  the  door,  secured  by  battens  nailed  crosswise. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  batten 
  n  :  fixed  to  something  to  hold  it  firm 
  v  1:  furnish  with  battens;  of  ships  [syn:  {batten  down},  {secure}] 
  2:  secure  with  battens;  "batten  down  a  ship's  hatches" 




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