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bismuth

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bismuth


  3  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Bismuth  \Bis"muth\,  n.  [Ger.  bismuth,  wismuth:  cf  F.  bismuth.] 
  (Chem.) 
  One  of  the  elements;  a  metal  of  a  reddish  white  color, 
  crystallizing  in  rhombohedrons.  It  is  somewhat  harder  than 
  lead,  and  rather  brittle;  masses  show  broad  cleavage  surfaces 
  when  broken  across  It  melts  at  507[deg]  Fahr.,  being  easily 
  fused  in  the  flame  of  a  candle.  It  is  found  in  a  native 
  state,  and  as  a  constituent  of  some  minerals.  Specific 
  gravity  9.8.  Atomic  weight  207.5.  Symbol  Bi 
 
  Note:  Chemically,  bismuth  (with  arsenic  and  antimony  is 
  intermediate  between  the  metals  and  nonmetals;  it  is 
  used  in  thermo-electric  piles,  and  as  an  alloy  with 
  lead  and  tin  in  the  fusible  alloy  or  metal.  Bismuth  is 
  the  most  diamagnetic  substance  known 
 
  {Bismuth  glance},  bismuth  sulphide;  bismuthinite. 
 
  {Bismuth  ocher},  a  native  bismuth  oxide;  bismite. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  bismuth 
  n  :  a  heavy  brittle  diamagnetic  trivalent  metallic  element 
  (resembles  arsenic  and  antimony  chemically);  usually 
  recovered  as  a  by-product  from  ores  of  other  metals  [syn: 
  {Bi},  {atomic  number  83}] 
 
  From  Elements  database  20001107  [elements]: 
 
  bismuth 
  Symbol:  Bi 
  Atomic  number:  83 
  Atomic  weight:  208.980 
  White  crystalline  metal  with  a  pink  tinge,  belongs  to  group  15.  Most 
  diamagnetic  of  all  metals  and  has  the  lowest  thermal  conductivity  of  all 
  the  elements  except  mercury.  Lead-free  bismuth  compounds  are  used  in 
  cosmetics  and  medical  procedures.  Burns  in  the  air  and  produces  a  blue 
  flame.  In  1753,  C.G.  Junine  first  demonstrated  that  it  was  different  from 
  lead. 
 
 




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