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blackjack

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blackjack


  5  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Oak  \Oak\  ([=o]k),  n.  [OE.  oke,  ok  ak  AS  [=a]c;  akin  to  D. 
  eik,  G.  eiche,  OHG.  eih,  Icel.  eik,  Sw  ek  Dan.  eeg.] 
  1.  (Bot.)  Any  tree  or  shrub  of  the  genus  {Quercus}.  The  oaks 
  have  alternate  leaves,  often  variously  lobed,  and 
  staminate  flowers  in  catkins.  The  fruit  is  a  smooth  nut, 
  called  an  {acorn},  which  is  more  or  less  inclosed  in  a 
  scaly  involucre  called  the  cup  or  cupule.  There  are  now 
  recognized  about  three  hundred  species,  of  which  nearly 
  fifty  occur  in  the  United  States,  the  rest  in  Europe, 
  Asia,  and  the  other  parts  of  North  America,  a  very  few 
  barely  reaching  the  northern  parts  of  South  America  and 
  Africa.  Many  of  the  oaks  form  forest  trees  of  grand 
  proportions  and  live  many  centuries.  The  wood  is  usually 
  hard  and  tough,  and  provided  with  conspicuous  medullary 
  rays,  forming  the  silver  grain. 
 
  2.  The  strong  wood  or  timber  of  the  oak. 
 
  Note:  Among  the  true  oaks  in  America  are: 
 
  {Barren  oak},  or 
 
  {Black-jack},  {Q.  nigra}. 
 
  {Basket  oak},  {Q.  Michauxii}. 
 
  {Black  oak},  {Q.  tinctoria};  --  called  also  {yellow}  or 
  {quercitron  oak}. 
 
  {Bur  oak}  (see  under  {Bur}.),  {Q.  macrocarpa};  --  called  also 
  {over-cup}  or  {mossy-cup  oak}. 
 
  {Chestnut  oak},  {Q.  Prinus}  and  {Q.  densiflora}. 
 
  {Chinquapin  oak}  (see  under  {Chinquapin}),  {Q.  prinoides}. 
 
  {Coast  live  oak},  {Q.  agrifolia},  of  California;  --  also 
  called  {enceno}. 
 
  {Live  oak}  (see  under  {Live}),  {Q.  virens},  the  best  of  all 
  for  shipbuilding;  also  {Q.  Chrysolepis},  of  California. 
 
 
  {Pin  oak}.  Same  as  {Swamp  oak}. 
 
  {Post  oak},  {Q.  obtusifolia}. 
 
  {Red  oak},  {Q.  rubra}. 
 
  {Scarlet  oak},  {Q.  coccinea}. 
 
  {Scrub  oak},  {Q.  ilicifolia},  {Q.  undulata},  etc 
 
  {Shingle  oak},  {Q.  imbricaria}. 
 
  {Spanish  oak},  {Q.  falcata}. 
 
  {Swamp  Spanish  oak},  or 
 
  {Pin  oak},  {Q.  palustris}. 
 
  {Swamp  white  oak},  {Q.  bicolor}. 
 
  {Water  oak},  {Q.  aguatica}. 
 
  {Water  white  oak},  {Q.  lyrata}. 
 
  {Willow  oak},  {Q.  Phellos}.  Among  the  true  oaks  in  Europe 
  are: 
 
  {Bitter  oak},  or 
 
  {Turkey  oak},  {Q.  Cerris}  (see  {Cerris}). 
 
  {Cork  oak},  {Q.  Suber}. 
 
  {English  white  oak},  {Q.  Robur}. 
 
  {Evergreen  oak}, 
 
  {Holly  oak},  or 
 
  {Holm  oak},  {Q.  Ilex}. 
 
  {Kermes  oak},  {Q.  coccifera}. 
 
  {Nutgall  oak},  {Q.  infectoria}. 
 
  Note:  Among  plants  called  oak,  but  not  of  the  genus 
  {Quercus},  are: 
 
  {African  oak},  a  valuable  timber  tree  ({Oldfieldia 
  Africana}). 
 
  {Australian,  or  She},  {oak},  any  tree  of  the  genus 
  {Casuarina}  (see  {Casuarina}). 
 
  {Indian  oak},  the  teak  tree  (see  {Teak}). 
 
  {Jerusalem  oak}.  See  under  {Jerusalem}. 
 
  {New  Zealand  oak},  a  sapindaceous  tree  ({Alectryon 
  excelsum}). 
 
  {Poison  oak},  the  poison  ivy.  See  under  {Poison}. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Sphalerite  \Sphal"er*ite\,  n.  [Gr.  ???  slippery,  uncertain.  See 
  {Blende}.]  (Min.) 
  Zinc  sulphide;  --  called  also  {blende},  {black-jack},  {false 
  galena},  etc  See  {Blende} 
  a  . 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Blende  \Blende\,  n.  [G.,  fr  blenden  to  blind,  dazzle,  deceive, 
  fr  blind  blind.  So  called  either  in  allusion  to  its  dazzling 
  luster;  or  (Dana)  because  though  often  resembling  galena,  it 
  yields  no  lead.  Cf  {Sphalerite}.]  (Min.) 
  a  A  mineral,  called  also  {sphalerite},  and  by  miners  {mock 
  lead},  {false  galena},  and  {black-jack}.  It  is  a  zinc 
  sulphide,  but  often  contains  some  iron.  Its  color  is 
  usually  yellow,  brown,  or  black,  and  its  luster  resinous. 
  b  A  general  term  for  some  minerals,  chiefly  metallic 
  sulphides  which  have  a  somewhat  brilliant  but  nonmetallic 
  luster. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Black-jack  \Black"-jack`\,  n. 
  1.  (Min.)  A  name  given  by  English  miners  to  sphalerite,  or 
  zinc  blende;  --  called  also  {false  galena}.  See  {Blende}. 
 
  2.  Caramel  or  burnt  sugar,  used  to  color  wines,  spirits, 
  ground  coffee,  etc 
 
  3.  A  large  leather  vessel  for  beer,  etc  [Obs.] 
 
  4.  (Bot.)  The  {Quercus  nigra},  or  barren  oak. 
 
  5.  The  ensign  of  a  pirate. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  blackjack 
  n  1:  a  common  scrubby  deciduous  tree  of  central  and  southeastern 
  United  States  having  dark  bark  and  broad  3-lobed 
  (club-shaped)  leaves;  tends  to  form  dense  thickets  [syn: 
  {blackjack  oak},  {jack  oak},  {Quercus  marilandica}] 
  2:  a  piece  of  leather-covered  metal  with  a  flexible  handle; 
  used  for  hitting  people  [syn:  {cosh},  {sap}] 
  3:  a  card  game  in  which  the  object  is  to  hold  cards  having  a 
  higher  count  than  those  dealt  to  the  bank  up  to  but  not 
  exceeding  21  [syn:  {twenty-one},  {vingt-et-un}] 
  v  :  exert  pressure  on  someone  through  threats  [syn:  {blackmail}, 
  {pressure}] 




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