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bring

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bring


  2  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Bring  \Bring\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Brought};  p.  pr  &  vb  n. 
  {Bringing}.]  [OE.  bringen,  AS  bringan  akin  to  OS  brengian 
  D.  brengen  Fries.  brenga,  OHG.  bringan  G.  bringen,  Goth. 
  briggan.] 
  1.  To  convey  to  the  place  where  the  speaker  is  or  is  to  be 
  to  bear  from  a  more  distant  to  a  nearer  place  to  fetch. 
 
  And  as  she  was  going  to  fetch  it  he  called  to  her 
  and  said  Bring  me  I  pray  thee,  a  morsel  of  bread. 
  --1  Kings 
  xvii.  11. 
 
  To  France  shall  we  convey  you  safe,  And  bring  you 
  back  --Shak. 
 
  2.  To  cause  the  accession  or  obtaining  of  to  procure;  to 
  make  to  come  to  produce;  to  draw  to 
 
  There  is  nothing  will  bring  you  more  honor  .  .  . 
  than  to  do  what  right  in  justice  you  may  --Bacon. 
 
  3.  To  convey;  to  move  to  carry  or  conduct. 
 
  In  distillation,  the  water  .  .  .  brings  over  with  it 
  some  part  of  the  oil  of  vitriol.  --Sir  I. 
  Newton. 
 
  4.  To  persuade;  to  induce;  to  draw;  to  lead;  to  guide. 
 
  It  seems  so  preposterous  a  thing  .  .  .  that  they  do 
  not  easily  bring  themselves  to  it  --Locke. 
 
  The  nature  of  the  things  .  .  .  would  not  suffer  him 
  to  think  otherwise,  how  or  whensoever,  he  is 
  brought  to  reflect  on  them  --Locke. 
 
  5.  To  produce  in  exchange;  to  sell  for  to  fetch;  as  what 
  does  coal  bring  per  ton? 
 
  {To  bring  about},  to  bring  to  pass;  to  effect;  to  accomplish. 
 
 
  {To  bring  back}. 
  a  To  recall. 
  b  To  restore,  as  something  borrowed,  to  its  owner. 
 
  {To  bring  by  the  lee}  (Naut.),  to  incline  so  rapidly  to 
  leeward  of  the  course,  when  a  ship  sails  large  as  to 
  bring  the  lee  side  suddenly  to  the  windward,  any  by  laying 
  the  sails  aback,  expose  her  to  danger  of  upsetting. 
 
  {To  bring  down}. 
  a  To  cause  to  come  down 
  b  To  humble  or  abase;  as  to  bring  down  high  looks 
 
  {To  bring  down  the  house},  to  cause  tremendous  applause. 
  [Colloq.] 
 
  {To  bring  forth}. 
  a  To  produce,  as  young  fruit. 
  b  To  bring  to  light;  to  make  manifest. 
 
  {To  bring  forward} 
  a  To  exhibit;  to  introduce;  to  produce  to  view. 
  b  To  hasten;  to  promote;  to  forward. 
  c  To  propose;  to  adduce;  as  to  bring  forward  arguments. 
 
 
  {To  bring  home}. 
  a  To  bring  to  one's  house. 
  b  To  prove  conclusively;  as  to  bring  home  a  charge  of 
  treason. 
  c  To  cause  one  to  feel  or  appreciate  by  personal 
  experience. 
  d  (Naut.)  To  lift  of  its  place  as  an  anchor. 
 
  {To  bring  in}. 
  a  To  fetch  from  without  to  import. 
  b  To  introduce,  as  a  bill  in  a  deliberative  assembly. 
  c  To  return  or  repot  to  or  lay  before  a  court  or  other 
  body;  to  render;  as  to  bring  in  a  verdict  or  a 
  report. 
  d  To  take  to  an  appointed  place  of  deposit  or 
  collection;  as  to  bring  in  provisions  or  money  for  a 
  specified  object. 
  e  To  produce,  as  income. 
  f  To  induce  to  join 
 
  {To  bring  off},  to  bear  or  convey  away  to  clear  from 
  condemnation;  to  cause  to  escape. 
 
  {To  bring  on}. 
  a  To  cause  to  begin. 
  b  To  originate  or  cause  to  exist;  as  to  bring  on  a 
  disease. 
 
  {To  bring  one  on  one's  way},  to  accompany,  guide,  or  attend 
  one 
 
  {To  bring  out},  to  expose;  to  detect;  to  bring  to  light  from 
  concealment. 
 
  {To  bring  over}. 
  a  To  fetch  or  bear  across 
  b  To  convert  by  persuasion  or  other  means  to  cause  to 
  change  sides  or  an  opinion. 
 
  {To  bring  to}. 
  a  To  resuscitate;  to  bring  back  to  consciousness  or 
  life,  as  a  fainting  person. 
  b  (Naut.)  To  check  the  course  of  as  of  a  ship,  by 
  dropping  the  anchor,  or  by  counterbracing  the  sails  so 
  as  to  keep  her  nearly  stationary  (she  is  then  said  to 
  lie  to). 
  c  To  cause  (a  vessel)  to  lie  to  as  by  firing  across  her 
  course. 
  d  To  apply  a  rope  to  the  capstan. 
 
  {To  bring  to  light},  to  disclose;  to  discover;  to  make  clear; 
  to  reveal. 
 
  {To  bring  a  sail  to}  (Naut.),  to  bend  it  to  the  yard. 
 
  {To  bring  to  pass},  to  accomplish  to  effect.  ``Trust  also  in 
  Him  and  He  shall  bring  it  to  pass.''  --Ps.  xxxvii  5. 
 
  {To  bring  under},  to  subdue;  to  restrain;  to  reduce  to 
  obedience. 
 
  {To  bring  up}. 
  a  To  carry  upward;  to  nurse;  to  rear;  to  educate. 
  b  To  cause  to  stop  suddenly. 
  c 
 
  Note:  [v.  i.  by  dropping  the  reflexive  pronoun]  To  stop 
  suddenly;  to  come  to  a  standstill.  [Colloq.] 
 
  {To  bring  up  (any  one)  with  a  round  turn},  to  cause  (any  one) 
  to  stop  abruptly.  [Colloq.] 
 
  {To  be  brought  to  bed}.  See  under  {Bed}. 
 
  Syn:  To  fetch;  bear;  carry;  convey;  transport;  import; 
  procure;  produce;  cause  adduce;  induce. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  bring 
  v  1:  take  something  or  somebody  with  oneself  somewhere;  "Bring  me 
  the  box  from  the  other  room";  "Take  these  letters  to 
  the  boss";  also  metaphorical,  as  in  "This  brings  me  to 
  the  main  point"  [syn:  {convey},  {take}] 
  2:  cause  to  come  into  a  particular  state  or  condition:  "Long 
  hard  years  of  on  the  job  training  had  brought  them  to 
  their  competence";  "bring  water  to  the  boiling  point" 
  3:  cause  to  happen  or  to  occur  as  a  consequence;  "wreak  havoc"; 
  "bring  comments";  "play  a  joke";  "The  rain  brought  relief 
  to  the  drought-stricken  area"  [syn:  {work},  {play},  {wreak}, 
  {make  for}] 
  4:  bring  or  fetch;  "Get  me  those  books  over  there  please"; 
  "Could  you  bring  over  the  wine?";  "The  dog  fetched  the 
  hat"  [syn:  {get},  {convey},  {fetch}]  [ant:  {take  away}] 
  5:  bring  into  a  different  state;  "this  may  land  you  in  jail" 
  [syn:  {land}] 
  6:  be  accompanied  by  "Can  I  bring  my  cousing  to  the  dinner?" 
  7:  advance  or  set  forth  in  court;  "bring  charges",  "institute 
  proceedings"  [syn:  {institute}] 
  8:  of  a  quality,  as  in:  "Her  presence  lends  a  certain  cachet  to 
  the  company";  "The  music  added  a  lot  to  the  play";  "She 
  brings  a  special  atmosphere  to  our  meetings";  "This  adds  a 
  light  note  to  the  program"  [syn:  {lend},  {impart},  {bestow}, 
  {contribute},  {add}] 
  9:  be  sold  for  a  certain  price;  "The  painting  brought  $10,000"; 
  "The  old  print  fetched  a  high  price  at  the  auction"  [syn: 
  {fetch},  {bring  in}] 
  10:  attract  the  attention  of  "The  noise  and  the  screaming 
  brought  the  curious" 
  11:  induce  or  persuade;  "The  confession  of  one  of  the  accused 
  brought  the  others  to  admit  to  the  crime  as  well" 




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