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carve

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carve


  5  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Carve  \Carve\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Carved};  p.  pr  &  vb  n. 
  {Carving}.]  [AS.  ceorfan  to  cut,  carve;  akin  to  D.  kerven,  G. 
  kerben  Dan.  karve,  Sw  karfva  and  to  Gr  ?  to  write,  orig. 
  to  scatch,  and  E.  -graphy.  Cf  {Graphic}.] 
  1.  To  cut.  [Obs.] 
 
  Or  they  will  carven  the  shepherd's  throat. 
  --Spenser. 
 
  2.  To  cut,  as  wood,  stone,  or  other  material,  in  an  artistic 
  or  decorative  manner;  to  sculpture;  to  engrave. 
 
  Carved  with  figures  strange  and  sweet.  --Coleridge. 
 
  3.  To  make  or  shape  by  cutting,  sculpturing,  or  engraving;  to 
  form  as  to  carve  a  name  on  a  tree. 
 
  An  angel  carved  in  stone.  --Tennyson. 
 
  We  carved  not  a  line  and  we  raised  not  a  stone. 
  --C.  Wolfe. 
 
  4.  To  cut  into  small  pieces  or  slices,  as  meat  at  table;  to 
  divide  for  distribution  or  apportionment;  to  apportion. 
  ``To  carve  a  capon.''  --Shak. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Carve  \Carve\,  v.  i. 
  1.  To  exercise  the  trade  of  a  sculptor  or  carver;  to  engrave 
  or  cut  figures. 
 
  2.  To  cut  up  meat;  as  to  carve  for  all  the  guests. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Carve  \Carve\,  n. 
  A  carucate.  [Obs.]  --Burrill. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  carve 
  v  1:  form  by  carving;  "Carve  a  flower  from  the  ice" 
  2:  engrave  or  cut  by  chipping  away  at  a  surface;  "carve  one's 
  name  into  the  bark"  [syn:  {chip  at}] 
  3:  cut  to  pieces;  "Father  carved  the  ham"  [syn:  {cut  up}] 
 
  From  Easton's  1897  Bible  Dictionary  [easton]: 
 
  Carve 
  The  arts  of  engraving  and  carving  were  much  practised  among  the 
  Jews.  They  were  practised  in  connection  with  the  construction  of 
  the  tabernacle  and  the  temple  (Ex.  31:2,  5;  35:33;  1  Kings  6:18, 
  35;  Ps  74:6),  as  well  as  in  the  ornamentation  of  the  priestly 
  dresses  (Ex.  28:9-36;  Zech.  3:9;  2  Chr.  2:7,  14).  Isaiah 
  (44:13-17)  gives  a  minute  description  of  the  process  of  carving 
  idols  of  wood. 
 




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