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cassia

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cassia


  3  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Cassia  \Cas"sia\,  n.  [L.  cassia  and  casia,  Gr  ?  and  ?;  of 
  Semitic  origin;  cf  Heb.  qets[=i][=a]h,  fr  q[=a]tsa'  to  cut 
  off  to  peel  off.] 
  1.  (Bot.)  A  genus  of  leguminous  plants  (herbs,  shrubs,  or 
  trees)  of  many  species,  most  of  which  have  purgative 
  qualities.  The  leaves  of  several  species  furnish  the  senna 
  used  in  medicine. 
 
  2.  The  bark  of  several  species  of  {Cinnamomum}  grown  in 
  China,  etc.;  Chinese  cinnamon.  It  is  imported  as  {cassia}, 
  but  commonly  sold  as  cinnamon,  from  which  it  differs  more 
  or  less  in  strength  and  flavor,  and  the  amount  of  outer 
  bark  attached. 
 
  Note:  The  medicinal  ``cassia''  (Cassia  pulp)  is  the  laxative 
  pulp  of  the  pods  of  a  leguminous  tree  ({Cassia  fistula} 
  or  Pudding-pipe  tree),  native  in  the  East  Indies  but 
  naturalized  in  various  tropical  countries. 
 
  {Cassia  bark},  the  bark  of  {Cinnamomum  cassia},  etc  The 
  coarser  kinds  are  called  {Cassia  lignea},  and  are  often 
  used  to  adulterate  true  cinnamon. 
 
  {Cassia  buds},  the  dried  flower  buds  of  several  species  of 
  cinnamon  ({Cinnamomum  cassia},  atc..). 
 
  {Cassia  oil},  oil  extracted  from  cassia  bark  and  cassia  buds; 
  --  called  also  {oil  of  cinnamon}. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  cassia 
  n  1:  any  of  various  trees  or  shrubs  of  the  genus  Cassia  having 
  pinnately  compound  leaves  and  usually  yellow  flowers 
  followed  by  long  seedpods 
  2:  Chinese  tree  with  aromatic  bark;  yields  a  less  desirable 
  cinnamon  than  Ceylon  cinnamon  [syn:  {cassia-bark  tree},  {Cinnamomum 
  cassia}] 
 
  From  Easton's  1897  Bible  Dictionary  [easton]: 
 
  Cassia 
  (1.)  Hebrew  _kiddah'_,  i.e.,  "split."  One  of  the  principal 
  spices  of  the  holy  anointing  oil  (Ex.  30:24),  and  an  article  of 
  commerce  (Ezek.  27:19).  It  is  the  inner  bark  of  a  tree 
  resembling  the  cinnamon  (q.v.),  the  Cinnamomum  cassia  of 
  botanists,  and  was  probably  imported  from  India. 
 
  (2.)  Hebrew  pl  _ketzi'oth_  (Ps.  45:8).  Mentioned  in 
  connection  with  myrrh  and  aloes  as  being  used  to  scent  garments. 
  It  was  probably  prepared  from  the  peeled  bark,  as  the  Hebrew 
  word  suggests,  of  some  kind  of  cinnamon. 
 




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