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chest

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chest


  7  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Chest  \Chest\,  v.  i.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Chested}.] 
  1.  To  deposit  in  a  chest;  to  hoard. 
 
  2.  To  place  in  a  coffin.  [Obs.] 
 
  He  dieth  and  is  chested.  --Gen.  1.  26 
  (heading). 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Chest  \Chest\,  n.  [AS.  ce['a]st.] 
  Strife;  contention;  controversy.  [Obs.]  --P.  Plowman. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Chest  \Chest\  (ch[e^]st),  n.  [OE.  chest,  chist,  AS  cest,  cist, 
  cyst,  L.  cista,  fr  Gr  ki`sth.  Cf  {Cist},  {Cistern}.] 
  1.  A  large  box  of  wood,  or  other  material,  having  like  a 
  trunk,  a  lid,  but  no  covering  of  skin,  leather,  or  cloth. 
 
  Heaps  of  money  crowded  in  the  chest.  --Dryden. 
 
  2.  A  coffin.  [Obs.] 
 
  He  is  now  dead  and  mailed  in  his  cheste.  --Chaucer. 
 
  3.  The  part  of  the  body  inclosed  by  the  ribs  and  breastbone; 
  the  thorax. 
 
  4.  (Com.)  A  case  in  which  certain  goods,  as  tea,  opium,  etc., 
  are  transported;  hence  the  quantity  which  such  a  case 
  contains. 
 
  5.  (Mech.)  A  tight  receptacle  or  box,  usually  for  holding 
  gas,  steam,  liquids,  etc.;  as  the  steam  chest  of  an 
  engine;  the  wind  chest  of  an  organ. 
 
  {Bomb  chest},  See  under  {Bomb}. 
 
  {Chest  of  drawers},  a  case  or  movable  frame  containing 
  drawers. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Ice  \Ice\  ([imac]s),  n.  [OE.  is  iis,  AS  [=i]s;  aksin  to  D. 
  ijs,  G.  eis,  OHG.  [=i]s,  Icel.  [=i]ss,  Sw  is  Dan.  iis,  and 
  perh.  to  E.  iron.] 
  1.  Water  or  other  fluid  frozen  or  reduced  to  the  solid  state 
  by  cold;  frozen  water.  It  is  a  white  or  transparent 
  colorless  substance,  crystalline,  brittle,  and  viscoidal. 
  Its  specific  gravity  (0.92,  that  of  water  at  4[deg]  C. 
  being  1.0)  being  less  than  that  of  water,  ice  floats. 
 
  Note:  Water  freezes  at  32[deg]  F.  or  0[deg]  Cent.,  and  ice 
  melts  at  the  same  temperature.  Ice  owes  its  cooling 
  properties  to  the  large  amount  of  heat  required  to  melt 
  it 
 
  2.  Concreted  sugar.  --Johnson. 
 
  3.  Water,  cream,  custard,  etc.,  sweetened,  flavored,  and 
  artificially  frozen. 
 
  4.  Any  substance  having  the  appearance  of  ice;  as  camphor 
  ice. 
 
  {Anchor  ice},  ice  which  sometimes  forms  about  stones  and 
  other  objects  at  the  bottom  of  running  or  other  water,  and 
  is  thus  attached  or  anchored  to  the  ground. 
 
  {Bay  ice},  ice  formed  in  bays,  fiords,  etc.,  often  in 
  extensive  fields  which  drift  out  to  sea. 
 
  {Ground  ice},  anchor  ice. 
 
  {Ice  age}  (Geol.),  the  glacial  epoch  or  period.  See  under 
  {Glacial}. 
 
  {Ice  anchor}  (Naut.),  a  grapnel  for  mooring  a  vessel  to  a 
  field  of  ice.  --Kane. 
 
  {Ice  blink}  [Dan.  iisblink],  a  streak  of  whiteness  of  the 
  horizon,  caused  by  the  reflection  of  light  from  ice  not 
  yet  in  sight. 
 
  {Ice  boat}. 
  a  A  boat  fitted  with  skates  or  runners,  and  propelled  on 
  ice  by  sails;  an  ice  yacht. 
  b  A  strong  steamboat  for  breaking  a  channel  through  ice. 
 
 
  {Ice  box}  or  {chest},  a  box  for  holding  ice;  a  box  in  which 
  things  are  kept  cool  by  means  of  ice;  a  refrigerator. 
 
  {Ice  brook},  a  brook  or  stream  as  cold  as  ice.  [Poetic] 
  --Shak. 
 
  {Ice  cream}  [for  iced  cream],  cream,  milk,  or  custard, 
  sweetened,  flavored,  and  frozen. 
 
  {Ice  field},  an  extensive  sheet  of  ice. 
 
  {Ice  float},  {Ice  floe},  a  sheet  of  floating  ice  similar  to 
  an  ice  field,  but  smaller. 
 
  {Ice  foot},  shore  ice  in  Arctic  regions;  an  ice  belt.  --Kane. 
 
  {Ice  house},  a  close-covered  pit  or  building  for  storing  ice. 
 
 
  {Ice  machine}  (Physics),  a  machine  for  making  ice 
  artificially,  as  by  the  production  of  a  low  temperature 
  through  the  sudden  expansion  of  a  gas  or  vapor,  or  the 
  rapid  evaporation  of  a  volatile  liquid. 
 
  {Ice  master}.  See  {Ice  pilot}  (below). 
 
  {Ice  pack},  an  irregular  mass  of  broken  and  drifting  ice. 
 
  {Ice  paper},  a  transparent  film  of  gelatin  for  copying  or 
  reproducing;  papier  glac['e]. 
 
  {Ice  petrel}  (Zo["o]l.),  a  shearwater  ({Puffinus  gelidus})  of 
  the  Antarctic  seas,  abundant  among  floating  ice. 
 
  {Ice  pick},  a  sharp  instrument  for  breaking  ice  into  small 
  pieces. 
 
  {Ice  pilot},  a  pilot  who  has  charge  of  a  vessel  where  the 
  course  is  obstructed  by  ice,  as  in  polar  seas;  --  called 
  also  {ice  master}. 
 
  {Ice  pitcher},  a  pitcher  adapted  for  ice  water. 
 
  {Ice  plow},  a  large  tool  for  grooving  and  cutting  ice. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  chest 
  n  1:  the  part  of  the  human  body  between  the  neck  and  the 
  diaphragm  or  the  corresponding  part  in  other  vertebrates 
  [syn:  {thorax},  {pectus}] 
  2:  box  with  a  lid;  used  for  storage;  usually  large  and  sturdy 
  3:  furniture  with  drawers  for  keeping  clothes  [syn:  {chest  of 
  drawers},  {bureau},  {dresser}] 
 
  From  Easton's  1897  Bible  Dictionary  [easton]: 
 
  Chest 
  (Heb.  _'aron_,  generally  rendered  "ark"),  the  coffer  into  which 
  the  contributions  for  the  repair  of  the  temple  were  put  (2  Kings 
  12:9,  10;  2  Chr.  24:8,  10,  11).  In  Gen.  50:26  it  is  rendered 
  "coffin."  In  Ezek.  27:24  a  different  Hebrew  word  _genazim_ 
  (plur.),  is  used  It  there  means  "treasure-chests." 
 
 
  From  V.E.R.A.  --  Virtual  Entity  of  Relevant  Acronyms  13  March  2001  [vera]: 
 
  CHEST 
  Computers  in  Higher  Education  Software  Team  (org.,  UK) 
 
 




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