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clock

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clock


  10  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Regulate  \Reg"u*late\  (-l[=a]t),  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Regulated} 
  (-l[=a]`t[e^]d);  p.  pr  &  vb  n.  {Regulating}.]  [L. 
  regulatus  p.  p.  of  regulare,  fr  regula.  See  {Regular}.] 
  1.  To  adjust  by  rule  method,  or  established  mode;  to  direct 
  by  rule  or  restriction;  to  subject  to  governing  principles 
  or  laws. 
 
  The  laws  which  regulate  the  successions  of  the 
  seasons.  --Macaulay. 
 
  The  herdsmen  near  the  frontier  adjudicated  their  own 
  disputes,  and  regulated  their  own  police. 
  --Bancroft. 
 
  2.  To  put  in  good  order  as  to  regulate  the  disordered  state 
  of  a  nation  or  its  finances. 
 
  3.  To  adjust  or  maintain,  with  respect  to  a  desired  rate, 
  degree,  or  condition;  as  to  regulate  the  temperature  of  a 
  room  the  pressure  of  steam,  the  speed  of  a  machine,  etc 
 
  {To  regulate  a  watch}  or  {clock},  to  adjust  its  rate  of 
  running  so  that  it  will  keep  approximately  standard  time. 
 
  Syn:  To  adjust  dispose;  methodize;  arrange;  direct;  order 
  rule  govern. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Beat  \Beat\,  n. 
  1.  A  stroke;  a  blow. 
 
  He  with  a  careless  beat  Struck  out  the  mute 
  creation  at  a  heat.  --Dryden. 
 
  2.  A  recurring  stroke;  a  throb;  a  pulsation;  as  a  beat  of 
  the  heart;  the  beat  of  the  pulse. 
 
  3.  (Mus.) 
  a  The  rise  or  fall  of  the  hand  or  foot,  marking  the 
  divisions  of  time;  a  division  of  the  measure  so 
  marked.  In  the  rhythm  of  music  the  beat  is  the  unit. 
  b  A  transient  grace  note,  struck  immediately  before  the 
  one  it  is  intended  to  ornament. 
 
  4.  (Acoustics  &  Mus.)  A  sudden  swelling  or  re["e]nforcement 
  of  a  sound,  recurring  at  regular  intervals,  and  produced 
  by  the  interference  of  sound  waves  of  slightly  different 
  periods  of  vibrations;  applied  also  by  analogy,  to  other 
  kinds  of  wave  motions;  the  pulsation  or  throbbing  produced 
  by  the  vibrating  together  of  two  tones  not  quite  in 
  unison.  See  {Beat},  v.  i.,  8. 
 
  5.  A  round  or  course  which  is  frequently  gone  over  as  a 
  watchman's  beat 
 
  6.  A  place  of  habitual  or  frequent  resort. 
 
  7.  A  cheat  or  swindler  of  the  lowest  grade;  --  often 
  emphasized  by  dead;  as  a  dead  beat  [Low] 
 
  {Beat  of  drum}  (Mil.),  a  succession  of  strokes  varied,  in 
  different  ways,  for  particular  purposes,  as  to  regulate  a 
  march,  to  call  soldiers  to  their  arms  or  quarters,  to 
  direct  an  attack,  or  retreat,  etc 
 
  {Beat  of  a  watch},  or  {clock},  the  stroke  or  sound  made  by 
  the  action  of  the  escapement.  A  clock  is  in  beat  or  out  of 
  beat  according  as  the  strokes  is  at  equal  or  unequal 
  intervals. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Clock  \Clock\,  n.  [AS.  clucge  bell;  akin  to  D.  klok  clock,  bell, 
  G.  glocke,  Dan.  klokke  Sw  klocka  Icel.  klukka  bell,  LL 
  clocca,  cloca  (whence  F.  cloche);  al  perh.  of  Celtic  origin; 
  cf  Ir  &  Gael.  clog  bell,  clock,  W.  cloch  bell.  Cf 
  {Cloak}.] 
  1.  A  machine  for  measuring  time,  indicating  the  hour  and 
  other  divisions  by  means  of  hands  moving  on  a  dial  plate. 
  Its  works  are  moved  by  a  weight  or  a  spring,  and  it  is 
  often  so  constructed  as  to  tell  the  hour  by  the  stroke  of 
  a  hammer  on  a  bell.  It  is  not  adapted,  like  the  watch,  to 
  be  carried  on  the  person. 
 
  2.  A  watch,  esp.  one  that  strikes.  [Obs.]  --Walton. 
 
  3.  The  striking  of  a  clock.  [Obs.]  --Dryden. 
 
  4.  A  figure  or  figured  work  on  the  ankle  or  side  of  a 
  stocking.  --Swift. 
 
  Note:  The  phrases  what  o'clock?  it  is  nine  o'clock,  etc.,  are 
  contracted  from  what  of  the  clock?  it  is  nine  of  the 
  clock,  etc 
 
  {Alarm  clock}.  See  under  {Alarm}. 
 
  {Astronomical  clock}. 
  a  A  clock  of  superior  construction,  with  a  compensating 
  pendulum,  etc.,  to  measure  time  with  great  accuracy, 
  for  use  in  astronomical  observatories;  --  called  a 
  regulator  when  used  by  watchmakers  as  a  standard  for 
  regulating  timepieces. 
  b  A  clock  with  mechanism  for  indicating  certain 
  astronomical  phenomena,  as  the  phases  of  the  moon, 
  position  of  the  sun  in  the  ecliptic,  equation  of  time, 
  etc 
 
  {Electric  clock}. 
  a  A  clock  moved  or  regulated  by  electricity  or 
  electro-magnetism. 
  b  A  clock  connected  with  an  electro-magnetic  recording 
  apparatus. 
 
  {Ship's  clock}  (Naut.),  a  clock  arranged  to  strike  from  one 
  to  eight  strokes,  at  half  hourly  intervals,  marking  the 
  divisions  of  the  ship's  watches. 
 
  {Sidereal  clock},  an  astronomical  clock  regulated  to  keep 
  sidereal  time. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Clock  \Clock\  (kl[o^]k),  v.  t. 
  To  ornament  with  figured  work  as  the  side  of  a  stocking. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Clock  \Clock\,  v.  t.  &  i. 
  To  call  as  a  hen.  See  {Cluck}.  [R.] 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Clock  \Clock\,  n.  (Zo["o]l.) 
  A  large  beetle,  esp.  the  European  dung  beetle  ({Scarab[ae]us 
  stercorarius}). 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  clock 
  n  :  a  timepiece  that  shows  the  time  of  day 
  v  :  measure  the  time  or  duration  of  an  event  or  action  or  the 
  person  who  performs  an  action  in  a  certain  period  of 
  time;  "he  clocked  the  runners"  [syn:  {time}] 
 
  From  Jargon  File  (4.2.3,  23  NOV  2000)  [jargon]: 
 
  clock  1.  n  1.  [techspeak]  The  master  oscillator  that  steps  a 
  CPU  or  other  digital  circuit  through  its  paces.  This  has  nothing  to  do 
  with  the  time  of  day  although  the  software  counter  that  keeps  track 
  of  the  latter  may  be  derived  from  the  former.  2.  vt  To  run  a  CPU  or 
  other  digital  circuit  at  a  particular  rate.  "If  you  clock  it  at  100MHz, 
  it  gets  warm.".  See  {overclock}.  3.  vt  To  force  a  digital  circuit 
  from  one  state  to  the  next  by  applying  a  single  clock  pulse.  "The  data 
  must  be  stable  10ns  before  you  clock  the  latch." 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  clock 
 
  A  processor's  clock  or  one  {cycle}  thereof.  The  relative 
  execution  times  of  instructions  on  a  computer  are  usually 
  measured  by  number  of  clock  cycles  rather  than  seconds.  One 
  good  reason  for  this  is  that  {clock  rate}s  for  various  models 
  of  the  computer  may  increase  as  technology  improves,  and  it  is 
  usually  the  relative  times  one  is  interested  in  when 
  discussing  the  {instruction  set}. 
 
  (1994-12-16) 
 
 
 
  From  THE  DEVIL'S  DICTIONARY  ((C)1911  Released  April  15  1993)  [devils]: 
 
  CLOCK,  n.  A  machine  of  great  moral  value  to  man,  allaying  his  concern 
  for  the  future  by  reminding  him  what  a  lot  of  time  remains  to  him 
 
  A  busy  man  complained  one  day: 
  "I  get  no  time!"  "What's  that  you  say?" 
  Cried  out  his  friend,  a  lazy  quiz; 
  "You  have  sir,  all  the  time  there  is 
  There's  plenty,  too  and  don't  you  doubt  it  -- 
  We're  never  for  an  hour  without  it." 
  Purzil  Crofe 
 
 




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