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dark

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dark


  4  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Dark  \Dark\  (d[aum]rk),  a.  [OE.  dark,  derk,  deork,  AS  dearc, 
  deorc;  cf  Gael.  &  Ir  dorch,  dorcha,  dark,  black,  dusky.] 
  1.  Destitute,  or  partially  destitute,  of  light;  not 
  receiving,  reflecting,  or  radiating  light;  wholly  or 
  partially  black,  or  of  some  deep  shade  of  color;  not 
  light-colored;  as  a  dark  room  a  dark  day  dark  cloth; 
  dark  paint;  a  dark  complexion. 
 
  O  dark,  dark,  dark,  amid  the  blaze  of  noon, 
  Irrecoverably  dark,  total  eclipse  Without  all  hope 
  of  day!  --Milton. 
 
  In  the  dark  and  silent  grave.  --Sir  W. 
  Raleigh. 
 
  2.  Not  clear  to  the  understanding;  not  easily  seen  through 
  obscure;  mysterious;  hidden. 
 
  The  dark  problems  of  existence.  --Shairp. 
 
  What  may  seem  dark  at  the  first  will  afterward  be 
  found  more  plain.  --Hooker. 
 
  What's  your  dark  meaning,  mouse,  of  this  light  word? 
  --Shak. 
 
  3.  Destitute  of  knowledge  and  culture;  in  moral  or 
  intellectual  darkness;  unrefined;  ignorant. 
 
  The  age  wherein  he  lived  was  dark,  but  he  Could  not 
  want  light  who  taught  the  world  to  see  --Denhan. 
 
  The  tenth  century  used  to  be  reckoned  by  medi[ae]val 
  historians  as  the  darkest  part  of  this  intellectual 
  night.  --Hallam. 
 
  4.  Evincing  black  or  foul  traits  of  character;  vile;  wicked; 
  atrocious;  as  a  dark  villain;  a  dark  deed. 
 
  Left  him  at  large  to  his  own  dark  designs.  --Milton. 
 
  5.  Foreboding  evil;  gloomy;  jealous;  suspicious. 
 
  More  dark  and  dark  our  woes.  --Shak. 
 
  A  deep  melancholy  took  possesion  of  him  and  gave  a 
  dark  tinge  to  all  his  views  of  human  nature. 
  --Macaulay. 
 
  There  is  in  every  true  woman-s  heart,  a  spark  of 
  heavenly  fire,  which  beams  and  blazes  in  the  dark 
  hour  of  adversity.  --W.  Irving. 
 
  6.  Deprived  of  sight;  blind.  [Obs.] 
 
  He  was  I  think,  at  this  time  quite  dark,  and  so  had 
  been  for  some  years.  --Evelyn. 
 
  Note:  Dark  is  sometimes  used  to  qualify  another  adjective; 
  as  dark  blue,  dark  green,  and  sometimes  it  forms  the 
  first  part  of  a  compound;  as  dark-haired,  dark-eyed, 
  dark-colored,  dark-seated,  dark-working. 
 
  {A  dark  horse},  in  racing  or  politics,  a  horse  or  a  candidate 
  whose  chances  of  success  are  not  known  and  whose 
  capabilities  have  not  been  made  the  subject  of  general 
  comment  or  of  wagers.  [Colloq.] 
 
  {Dark  house},  {Dark  room},  a  house  or  room  in  which  madmen 
  were  confined.  [Obs.]  --Shak. 
 
  {Dark  lantern}.  See  {Lantern}.  --  The 
 
  {Dark  Ages},  a  period  of  stagnation  and  obscurity  in 
  literature  and  art,  lasting,  according  to  Hallam,  nearly 
  1000  years,  from  about  500  to  about  1500  A.  D..  See 
  {Middle  Ages},  under  {Middle}. 
 
  {The  Dark  and  Bloody  Ground},  a  phrase  applied  to  the  State 
  of  Kentucky,  and  said  to  be  the  significance  of  its  name 
  in  allusion  to  the  frequent  wars  that  were  waged  there 
  between  Indians. 
 
  {The  dark  day},  a  day  (May  19,  1780)  when  a  remarkable  and 
  unexplained  darkness  extended  over  all  New  England. 
 
  {To  keep  dark},  to  reveal  nothing.  [Low] 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Dark  \Dark\,  n. 
  1.  Absence  of  light;  darkness;  obscurity;  a  place  where  there 
  is  little  or  no  light. 
 
  Here  stood  he  in  the  dark,  his  sharp  sword  out 
  --Shak. 
 
  2.  The  condition  of  ignorance;  gloom;  secrecy. 
 
  Look  what  you  do  you  do  it  still  i'  th'  dark. 
  --Shak. 
 
  Till  we  perceive  by  our  own  understandings,  we  are 
  as  muc?  in  the  dark,  and  as  void  of  knowledge,  as 
  before  --Locke. 
 
  3.  (Fine  Arts)  A  dark  shade  or  dark  passage  in  a  painting, 
  engraving,  or  the  like  as  the  light  and  darks  are  well 
  contrasted. 
 
  The  lights  may  serve  for  a  repose  to  the  darks,  and 
  the  darks  to  the  lights.  --Dryden. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Dark  \Dark\,  v.  t. 
  To  darken  to  obscure.  [Obs.]  --Milton. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  dark 
  adj  1:  devoid  or  partially  devoid  of  light  or  brightness;  shadowed 
  or  black  or  somber-colored;  "sitting  in  a  dark 
  corner";  "a  dark  day";  "dark  shadows";  "the  theater  is 
  dark  on  Mondays";  "dark  as  the  inside  of  a  black  cat" 
  [ant:  {light}] 
  2:  (used  of  color)  having  a  dark  hue;  "dark  green";  "dark 
  glasses";  "dark  colors  like  wine  red  or  navy  blue"  [ant:  {light}] 
  3:  (used  of  hair  or  skin  or  eyes)  "dark  eyes" 
  4:  stemming  from  evil  characteristics  or  forces;  wicked  or 
  dishonorable;  "black  deeds";  "a  black  lie";  "his  black 
  heart  has  concocted  yet  another  black  deed";  "Darth  Vader 
  of  the  dark  side";  "a  dark  purpose";  "dark  undercurrents 
  of  ethnic  hostility";  "the  scheme  of  some  sinister 
  intelligence  bent  on  punishing  him"-Thomas  Hardy  [syn:  {black}, 
  {sinister}] 
  5:  causing  dejection;  "a  blue  day";  "the  dark  days  of  the  war"; 
  "a  week  of  rainy  depressing  weather";  "a  disconsolate 
  winter  landscape";  "the  first  dismal  dispiriting  days  of 
  November";  "a  dark  gloomy  day";  "grim  rainy  weather"  [syn: 
  {blue},  {depressing},  {disconsolate},  {dismal},  {dispiriting}, 
  {gloomy},  {grim}] 
  6:  secret;  "keep  it  dark";  "the  dark  mysteries  of  Africa  and 
  the  fabled  wonders  of  the  East" 
  7:  showing  a  brooding  ill  humor;  "a  dark  scowl";  "the 
  proverbially  dour  New  England  Puritan";  "a  glum,  hopeless 
  shrug";  "he  sat  in  moody  silence";  "a  morose  and 
  unsociable  manner";  "a  saturnine,  almost  misanthropic 
  young  genius"-  Bruce  Bliven;  "a  sour  temper";  "a  sullen 
  crowd"  [syn:  {dour},  {glowering},  {glum},  {moody},  {morose}, 
  {saturnine},  {sour},  {sullen}] 
  8:  lacking  enlightenment  or  knowledge  or  culture;  "this 
  benighted  country";  "benighted  ages  of  barbarism  and 
  superstition";  "the  dark  ages";  "a  dark  age  in  the  history 
  of  education"  [syn:  {benighted}] 
  9:  marked  by  difficulty  of  style  or  expression;  "much  that  was 
  dark  is  now  quite  clear  to  me";  "those  who  do  not 
  appreciate  Kafka's  work  say  his  style  is  obscure"  [syn:  {obscure}] 
  10:  having  skin  rich  in  melanin  pigments;  "National  Association 
  for  the  Advancement  of  Colored  People";  "the  dark  races"; 
  "dark-skinned  peoples"  [syn:  {colored},  {coloured},  {dark-skinned}] 
  11:  not  giving  performances;  closed;  "the  theater  is  dark  on 
  Mondays" 
  n  1:  absence  of  light  or  illumination  [syn:  {darkness}]  [ant:  {light}] 
  2:  absence  of  moral  or  spiritual  values;  "the  powers  of 
  darkness"  [syn:  {iniquity},  {wickedness},  {darkness}] 
  3:  an  unilluminated  area;  "he  moved  off  into  the  darkness" 
  [syn:  {darkness},  {shadow}] 
  4:  the  time  after  sunset  and  before  sunrise  while  it  is  dark 
  outside  [syn:  {night},  {nighttime}]  [ant:  {day}] 
  5:  an  unenlightened  state;  "he  was  in  the  dark  concerning  their 
  intentions";  "his  lectures  dispelled  the  darkness"  [syn:  {darkness}] 




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