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declension

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declension


  2  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Declension  \De*clen"sion\,  n.  [Apparently  corrupted  fr  F. 
  d['e]clinaison,  fr  L.  declinatio,  fr  declinare.  See 
  {Decline},  and  cf  {Declination}.] 
  1.  The  act  or  the  state  of  declining;  declination;  descent; 
  slope. 
 
  The  declension  of  the  land  from  that  place  to  the 
  sea.  --T.  Burnet. 
 
  2.  A  falling  off  towards  a  worse  state;  a  downward  tendency; 
  deterioration;  decay;  as  the  declension  of  virtue,  of 
  science,  of  a  state,  etc 
 
  Seduced  the  pitch  and  height  of  all  his  thoughts  To 
  base  declension.  --Shak. 
 
  3.  Act  of  courteously  refusing;  act  of  declining;  a 
  declinature;  refusal;  as  the  declension  of  a  nomination. 
 
  4.  (Gram.) 
  a  Inflection  of  nouns,  adjectives,  etc.,  according  to 
  the  grammatical  cases. 
  b  The  form  of  the  inflection  of  a  word  declined  by 
  cases;  as  the  first  or  the  second  declension  of 
  nouns,  adjectives,  etc 
  c  Rehearsing  a  word  as  declined. 
 
  Note:  The  nominative  was  held  to  be  the  primary  and  original 
  form  and  was  likened  to  a  perpendicular  line  the 
  variations,  or  oblique  cases,  were  regarded  as  fallings 
  (hence  called  casus,  cases,  or  fallings)  from  the 
  nominative  or  perpendicular;  and  an  enumerating  of  the 
  various  forms,  being  a  sort  of  progressive  descent  from 
  the  noun's  upright  form  was  called  a  declension. 
  --Harris. 
 
  {Declension  of  the  needle},  declination  of  the  needle. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  declension 
  n  1:  the  inflection  of  nouns  and  pronouns  and  adjectives 
  2:  the  complete  set  of  inflected  forms  of  a  noun  or  pronoun  or 
  adjective 
  3:  a  class  of  nouns  having  the  same  inflectional  forms:  "the 
  first  declension  in  Latin" 




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