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delta

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delta


  8  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Delta  \Del"ta\,  n.;  pl  {Deltas}.  [Gr.  de`lta,  the  name  of  the 
  fourth  letter  of  the  Greek  alphabet  (the  capital  form  of 
  which  is  [Delta],  Eng.  D),  from  the  Ph[oe]nician  name  of  the 
  corresponding  letter.  The  Greeks  called  the  alluvial  deposit 
  at  the  mouth  of  the  Nile,  from  its  shape,  the  Delta  of  the 
  Nile.] 
  A  tract  of  land  shaped  like  the  letter  delta  ([Delta]), 
  especially  when  the  land  is  alluvial  and  inclosed  between  two 
  or  more  mouths  of  a  river;  as  the  delta  of  the  Ganges,  of 
  the  Nile,  or  of  the  Mississippi. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Delta  \Del"ta\,  n. 
  1.  The  fourth  letter  of  the  Greek  alphabet  ([Delta]  [delta]), 
  answering  to  {D}.  Hence  an  object  having  the  shape  of  the 
  capital  [Delta]. 
 
  2.  (Elec.)  The  closed  figure  produced  by  connecting  three 
  coils  or  circuits  successively,  end  for  end  esp.  in  a 
  three-phase  system;  --  often  used  attributively,  as  delta 
  winding,  delta  connection  (which  see),  etc 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  delta 
  n  1:  a  low  triangular  area  where  a  river  divides  before  entering 
  a  larger  body  of  water 
  2:  the  4th  letter  of  the  Greek  alphabet 
 
  From  U.S.  Gazetteer  (1990)  [gazetteer]: 
 
  Delta,  AL 
  Zip  code(s):  36258 
  Delta,  CO  (city,  FIPS  19850) 
  Location:  38.74477  N,  108.07369  W 
  Population  (1990):  3789  (1842  housing  units) 
  Area:  7.1  sq  km  (land),  0.4  sq  km  (water) 
  Zip  code(s):  81416 
  Delta,  IA  (city,  FIPS  19855) 
  Location:  41.32307  N,  92.32945  W 
  Population  (1990):  409  (198  housing  units) 
  Area:  2.6  sq  km  (land),  0.0  sq  km  (water) 
  Zip  code(s):  52550 
  Delta,  KY 
  Zip  code(s):  42613 
  Delta,  LA  (village,  FIPS  20330) 
  Location:  32.32384  N,  90.92323  W 
  Population  (1990):  234  (104  housing  units) 
  Area:  6.7  sq  km  (land),  0.4  sq  km  (water) 
  Delta,  MO  (city,  FIPS  19072) 
  Location:  37.19816  N,  89.73703  W 
  Population  (1990):  450  (184  housing  units) 
  Area:  0.7  sq  km  (land),  0.0  sq  km  (water) 
  Zip  code(s):  63744 
  Delta,  OH  (village,  FIPS  21616) 
  Location:  41.57412  N,  84.00253  W 
  Population  (1990):  2849  (1107  housing  units) 
  Area:  5.6  sq  km  (land),  0.0  sq  km  (water) 
  Zip  code(s):  43515 
  Delta,  PA  (borough,  FIPS  18800) 
  Location:  39.72605  N,  76.32774  W 
  Population  (1990):  761  (305  housing  units) 
  Area:  0.7  sq  km  (land),  0.0  sq  km  (water) 
  Zip  code(s):  17314 
  Delta,  UT  (city,  FIPS  18910) 
  Location:  39.35329  N,  112.56566  W 
  Population  (1990):  2998  (1012  housing  units) 
  Area:  7.6  sq  km  (land),  0.0  sq  km  (water) 
  Zip  code(s):  84624 
  Delta,  WI 
  Zip  code(s):  54856 
 
  From  Jargon  File  (4.2.3,  23  NOV  2000)  [jargon]: 
 
  delta  n.  1.  [techspeak]  A  quantitative  change,  especially  a 
  small  or  incremental  one  (this  use  is  general  in  physics  and  engineering). 
  "I  just  doubled  the  speed  of  my  program!"  "What  was  the  delta  on  program 
  size?"  "About  30  percent."  (He  doubled  the  speed  of  his  program,  but 
  increased  its  size  by  only  30  percent.)  2.  [Unix]  A  {diff},  especially  a 
  {diff}  stored  under  the  set  of  version-control  tools  called  SCCS  (Source 
  Code  Control  System)  or  RCS  (Revision  Control  System).  3.  n.  A  small 
  quantity,  but  not  as  small  as  {epsilon}.  The  jargon  usage  of  {delta}  and 
  {epsilon}  stems  from  the  traditional  use  of  these  letters  in  mathematics 
  for  very  small  numerical  quantities,  particularly  in  `epsilon-delta' 
  proofs  in  limit  theory  (as  in  the  differential  calculus).  The  term 
  {delta}  is  often  used  once  {epsilon}  has  been  mentioned,  to  mean  a 
  quantity  that  is  slightly  bigger  than  {epsilon}  but  still  very  small 
  "The  cost  isn't  epsilon,  but  it's  delta"  means  that  the  cost  isn't  totally 
  negligible,  but  it  is  nevertheless  very  small  Common 
  constructions  include  `within  delta  of  --',  `within  epsilon  of  --': 
  that  is  `close  to'  and  `even  closer  to'. 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  Delta 
 
   
 
  1.  An  expression-based  language  developed  by  J.C.  Cleaveland 
  in  1978. 
 
  2.  A  string-processing  language  with  single-character  commands 
  from  {Tandem  Computers}. 
 
  3.  A  language  for  system  specification  of  simulation 
  execution. 
 
  ["System  Description  and  the  DELTA  Language", 
  E.  Holback-Hansen  et  al  DELTA  Proj  Rep  4,  Norweg  Comput  Ctr, 
  Feb  1977]. 
 
  4.  A  {COBOL}  generating  language  produced  by  {Delta  Software 
  Entwicklung  GmbH  (http://www.delta-software.de/)}. 
 
  (2000-08-02) 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  delta 
 
  1.  A  quantitative  change,  especially  a  small  or  incremental 
  one  (this  use  is  general  in  physics  and  engineering).  "I  just 
  doubled  the  speed  of  my  program!"  "What  was  the  delta  on 
  program  size?"  "About  30  percent."  (He  doubled  the  speed  of 
  his  program,  but  increased  its  size  by  only  30  percent.) 
 
  2.  [Unix]  A  {diff},  especially  a  {diff}  stored  under  the  set 
  of  version-control  tools  called  SCCS  (Source  Code  Control 
  System)  or  RCS  (Revision  Control  System).  See  {change 
  management}. 
 
  3.  A  small  quantity,  but  not  as  small  as  {epsilon}.  The 
  jargon  usage  of  {delta}  and  {epsilon}  stems  from  the 
  traditional  use  of  these  letters  in  mathematics  for  very  small 
  numerical  quantities,  particularly  in  "epsilon-delta"  proofs 
  in  limit  theory  (as  in  the  differential  calculus).  The  term 
  {delta}  is  often  used  once  {epsilon}  has  been  mentioned,  to 
  mean  a  quantity  that  is  slightly  bigger  than  {epsilon}  but 
  still  very  small  "The  cost  isn't  epsilon,  but  it's  delta" 
  means  that  the  cost  isn't  totally  negligible,  but  it  is 
  nevertheless  very  small  Common  constructions  include  "within 
  delta  of  ---",  "within  epsilon  of  ---":  that  is  "close  to" 
  and  "even  closer  to". 
 
  [{Jargon  File}] 
 
  (2000-08-02) 
 
 
 
  From  V.E.R.A.  --  Virtual  Entity  of  Relevant  Acronyms  13  March  2001  [vera]: 
 
  DELTA 
  Developing  European  Learning  through  Technology  Advance 
 
 




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