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diddle

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diddle


  5  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Diddle  \Did"dle\,  v.  i.  [Cf.  {Daddle}.] 
  To  totter,  as  a  child  in  walking.  [Obs.]  --Quarles. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Diddle  \Did"dle\,  v.  t.  [Perh.  from  AS  dyderian  to  deceive,  the 
  letter  r  being  changed  to  l.] 
  To  cheat  or  overreach.  [Colloq.]  --Beaconsfield. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  diddle 
  v  1:  deprive  of  by  deceit;  "He  swindled  me  out  of  my  inheritance" 
  [syn:  {swindle},  {rook},  {nobble},  {bunco},  {defraud},  {mulct}, 
  {gyp},  {con}] 
  2:  manipulate  manually  with  no  purpose  or  aim  often  without 
  being  conscious  of  doing  so  "She  played  nervously  with 
  her  wedding  ring";  "Don't  fiddle  with  the  screws"  [syn:  {toy}, 
  {fiddle},  {play}] 
 
  From  Jargon  File  (4.2.3,  23  NOV  2000)  [jargon]: 
 
  diddle  1.  vt  To  work  with  or  modify  in  a  not  particularly 
  serious  manner.  "I  diddled  a  copy  of  {ADVENT}  so  it  didn't  double-space 
  all  the  time."  "Let's  diddle  this  piece  of  code  and  see  if  the  problem 
  goes  away."  See  {tweak}  and  {twiddle}.  2.  n.  The  action  or  result 
  of  diddling.  See  also  {tweak},  {twiddle},  {frob}. 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  diddle 
 
  1.  To  work  with  or  modify  in  a  not  particularly  serious 
  manner.  "I  diddled  a  copy  of  {ADVENT}  so  it  didn't 
  double-space  all  the  time."  "Let's  diddle  this  piece  of  code 
  and  see  if  the  problem  goes  away." 
 
  See  {tweak}  and  {twiddle}. 
 
  2.  The  action  or  result  of  diddling. 
 
  See  also  {tweak},  {twiddle},  {frob}. 
 
  [{Jargon  File}] 
 
  (1995-01-31) 
 
 




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