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disdain

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disdain


  4  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Disdain  \Dis*dain"\,  v.  i. 
  To  be  filled  with  scorn;  to  feel  contemptuous  anger;  to  be 
  haughty. 
 
  And  when  the  chief  priests  and  scribes  saw  the  marvels 
  that  he  did  .  .  .  they  disdained.  --Genevan 
  Testament 
  (Matt.  xxi. 
  15). 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Disdain  \Dis*dain"\  (?;  277),  n.  [OE.  desdain,  disdein,  OF 
  desdein  desdaing  F.  d['e]dain,  fr  the  verb  See  {Disdain}, 
  v.  t.] 
  1.  A  feeling  of  contempt  and  aversion;  the  regarding  anything 
  as  unworthy  of  or  beneath  one  scorn. 
 
  How  my  soul  is  moved  with  just  disdain!  --Pope. 
 
  Note:  Often  implying  an  idea  of  haughtiness. 
 
  Disdain  and  scorn  ride  sparkling  in  her  eyes. 
  --Shak. 
 
  2.  That  which  is  worthy  to  be  disdained  or  regarded  with 
  contempt  and  aversion.  [Obs.] 
 
  Most  loathsome,  filthy,  foul,  and  full  of  vile 
  disdain.  --Spenser. 
 
  3.  The  state  of  being  despised;  shame.  [Obs.]  --Shak. 
 
  Syn:  Haughtiness;  scorn;  contempt;  arrogance;  pride.  See 
  {Haughtiness}. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Disdain  \Dis*dain"\  (?;  277),  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Disdained}; 
  p.  pr  &  vb  n.  {Disdaining}.]  [OE.  disdainen,  desdainen  OF 
  desdeigner  desdaigner  F.  d['e]daigner;  des-  (L.  dis-)  + 
  daigner  to  deign,  fr  L.  dignari  to  deem  worthy.  See 
  {Deign}.] 
  1.  To  think  unworthy;  to  deem  unsuitable  or  unbecoming;  as 
  to  disdain  to  do  a  mean  act 
 
  Disdaining  .  .  .  that  any  should  bear  the  armor  of 
  the  best  knight  living.  --Sir  P. 
  Sidney. 
 
  2.  To  reject  as  unworthy  of  one's  self  or  as  not  deserving 
  one's  notice;  to  look  with  scorn  upon  to  scorn,  as  base 
  acts  character,  etc 
 
  When  the  Philistine  .  .  .  saw  Dawid,  he  disdained 
  him  for  he  was  but  a  youth.  --1  Sam.  xvii. 
  42. 
 
  'T  is  great,  't  manly  to  disdain  disguise.  --Young. 
 
  Syn:  To  contemn;  despise;  scorn.  See  {Contemn}. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  disdain 
  n  1:  lack  of  respect  accompanied  by  a  feeling  of  intense  dislike 
  [syn:  {contempt},  {scorn}] 
  2:  a  communication  that  indicates  lack  of  respect  by 
  patronizing  the  recipient  [syn:  {condescension},  {patronage}] 
  v  1:  look  down  on  with  disdain;  "He  despises  the  people  he  has  to 
  work  for";  "The  professor  scorns  the  students  who  don't 
  catch  on  immediately"  [syn:  {contemn},  {despise},  {scorn}] 
  2:  reject  with  contempt;  "She  spurned  his  advances"  [syn:  {reject}, 
  {spurn},  {freeze  off},  {scorn},  {pooh-pooh},  {turn  down}] 




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