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dump


  7  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Dump  \Dump\,  n. 
  1.  A  car  or  boat  for  dumping  refuse,  etc 
 
  2.  A  ground  or  place  for  dumping  ashes,  refuse,  etc 
 
  3.  That  which  is  dumped. 
 
  4.  (Mining)  A  pile  of  ore  or  rock. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Dump  \Dump\,  n.  [See  {Dumpling}.] 
  A  thick,  ill-shapen  piece;  a  clumsy  leaden  counter  used  by 
  boys  in  playing  chuck  farthing.  [Eng.]  --Smart. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Dump  \Dump\,  n.  [Cf.  dial.  Sw  dumpin  melancholy,  Dan.  dump 
  dull,  low  D.  dompig  damp,  G.  dumpf  damp,  dull,  gloomy,  and 
  E.  damp,  or  rather  perh.  dump,  v.  t.  Cf  {Damp},  or  {Dump}, 
  v.  t.] 
  1.  A  dull,  gloomy  state  of  the  mind;  sadness;  melancholy;  low 
  spirits;  despondency;  ill  humor;  --  now  used  only  in  the 
  plural. 
 
  March  slowly  on  in  solemn  dump.  --Hudibras. 
 
  Doleful  dumps  the  mind  oppress.  --Shak. 
 
  I  was  musing  in  the  midst  of  my  dumps.  --Bunyan. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Dump  \Dump\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Dumped};  p.  pr  &  vb  n. 
  {Dumping}.]  [OE.  dumpen  to  throw  down  fall  down  cf  Icel. 
  dumpa  to  thump,  Dan.  dumpe  to  fall  suddenly,  rush,  dial.  Sw 
  dimpa  to  fall  down  plump.  Cf  {Dump}  sadness.] 
  1.  To  knock  heavily;  to  stump.  [Prov.  Eng.]  --Halliwell. 
 
  2.  To  put  or  throw  down  with  more  or  less  of  violence;  hence 
  to  unload  from  a  cart  by  tilting  it  as  to  dump  sand, 
  coal,  etc  [U.S.]  --Bartlett. 
 
  {Dumping  car}  or  {cart},  a  railway  car  or  a  cart,  the  body 
  of  which  can  be  tilted  to  empty  the  contents;  --  called 
  also  {dump  car},  or  {dump  cart}. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  dump 
  n  1:  a  coarse  term  for  defecation;  "he  took  a  shit"  [syn:  {shit}] 
  2:  a  piece  of  land  where  waste  materials  are  dumped  [syn:  {garbage 
  dump},  {trash  dump},  {rubbish  dump},  {wasteyard},  {refuse 
  heap}] 
  v  1:  as  of  refuse;  "No  dumping  in  these  woods!" 
  2:  get  rid  of  unceremoniously  or  irresponsibly;  "The  company 
  dumped  him  after  many  years  of  service" 
  3:  sell  at  artificially  low  prices  [syn:  {underprice}] 
  4:  drop  in  a  heap  or  mass 
  5:  fall  abruptly;  "It  plunged  to  the  bottom  of  the  well"  [syn: 
  {plunge}] 
  6:  knock  down  with  force;  "He  decked  his  opponent"  [syn:  {deck}, 
  {coldcock},  {knock  down},  {floor}] 
 
  From  Jargon  File  (4.2.3,  23  NOV  2000)  [jargon]: 
 
  dump  n.  1.  An  undigested  and  voluminous  mass  of  information 
  about  a  problem  or  the  state  of  a  system,  especially  one  routed  to  the 
  slowest  available  output  device  (compare  {core  dump}),  and  most  especially 
  one  consisting  of  hex  or  octal  {runes}  describing  the  byte-by-byte  state 
  of  memory,  mass  storage,  or  some  file.  In  {elder  days},  debugging  was 
  generally  done  by  `groveling  over'  a  dump  (see  {grovel});  increasing  use 
  of  high-level  languages  and  interactive  debuggers  has  made  such  tedium 
  uncommon,  and  the  term  `dump'  now  has  a  faintly  archaic  flavor.  2.  A 
  backup.  This  usage  is  typical  only  at  large  timesharing  installations. 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  dump 
 
    1.  An  undigested  and  voluminous  mass  of 
  information  about  a  problem  or  the  state  of  a  system, 
  especially  one  routed  to  the  slowest  available  output  device 
  (compare  {core  dump}),  and  most  especially  one  consisting  of 
  {hexadecimal}  or  {octal}  {runes}  describing  the  byte-by-byte 
  state  of  memory,  mass  storage,  or  some  file.  In  {elder  days}, 
  debugging  was  generally  done  by  "groveling  over"  a  dump  (see 
  {grovel});  increasing  use  of  high-level  languages  and 
  interactive  debuggers  has  made  such  tedium  uncommon,  and  the 
  term  dump"  now  has  a  faintly  archaic  flavour. 
 
  2.  A  {backup}.  This  usage  is  typical  only  at  large 
  {time-sharing}  installations. 
 
  {Unix  manual  page}:  dump(1). 
 
  [{Jargon  File}] 
 
  (1994-12-01) 
 
 




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