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electricity

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electricity


  3  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Electricity  \E`lec*tric"i*ty\,  n.;  pl  {Electricities}.  [Cf.  F. 
  ['e]lectricit['e].  See  {Electric}.] 
  1.  A  power  in  nature,  a  manifestation  of  energy,  exhibiting 
  itself  when  in  disturbed  equilibrium  or  in  activity  by  a 
  circuit  movement,  the  fact  of  direction  in  which  involves 
  polarity,  or  opposition  of  properties  in  opposite 
  directions;  also  by  attraction  for  many  substances,  by  a 
  law  involving  attraction  between  surfaces  of  unlike 
  polarity,  and  repulsion  between  those  of  like  by 
  exhibiting  accumulated  polar  tension  when  the  circuit  is 
  broken;  and  by  producing  heat,  light,  concussion,  and 
  often  chemical  changes  when  the  circuit  passes  between  the 
  poles  or  through  any  imperfectly  conducting  substance  or 
  space.  It  is  generally  brought  into  action  by  any 
  disturbance  of  molecular  equilibrium,  whether  from  a 
  chemical,  physical,  or  mechanical,  cause 
 
  Note:  Electricity  is  manifested  under  following  different 
  forms:  a 
 
  {Statical  electricity},  called  also 
 
  {Frictional  or  Common},  {electricity},  electricity  in  the 
  condition  of  a  stationary  charge,  in  which  the  disturbance 
  is  produced  by  friction,  as  of  glass,  amber,  etc.,  or  by 
  induction.  b 
 
  {Dynamical  electricity},  called  also 
 
  {Voltaic  electricity},  electricity  in  motion,  or  as  a  current 
  produced  by  chemical  decomposition,  as  by  means  of  a 
  voltaic  battery,  or  by  mechanical  action  as  by 
  dynamo-electric  machines.  c 
 
  {Thermoelectricity},  in  which  the  disturbing  cause  is  heat 
  (attended  possibly  with  some  chemical  action).  It  is 
  developed  by  uniting  two  pieces  of  unlike  metals  in  a  bar, 
  and  then  heating  the  bar  unequally.  d 
 
  {Atmospheric  electricity},  any  condition  of  electrical 
  disturbance  in  the  atmosphere  or  clouds,  due  to  some  or 
  all  of  the  above  mentioned  causes.  e 
 
  {Magnetic  electricity},  electricity  developed  by  the  action 
  of  magnets.  f 
 
  {Positive  electricity},  the  electricity  that  appears  at  the 
  positive  pole  or  anode  of  a  battery,  or  that  is  produced 
  by  friction  of  glass;  --  called  also  {vitreous 
  electricity}.  g 
 
  {Negative  electricity},  the  electricity  that  appears  at  the 
  negative  pole  or  cathode,  or  is  produced  by  the  friction 
  of  resinous  substance;  --  called  also  resinous 
  electricity.  h 
 
  {Organic  electricity},  that  which  is  developed  in  organic 
  structures,  either  animal  or  vegetable,  the  phrase  animal 
  electricity  being  much  more  common. 
 
  2.  The  science  which  unfolds  the  phenomena  and  laws  of 
  electricity;  electrical  science. 
 
  3.  Fig.:  Electrifying  energy  or  characteristic. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  electricity 
  n  1:  a  form  of  energy  associated  with  moving  electrons  and 
  protons 
  2:  energy  made  available  by  the  flow  of  electric  charge  through 
  a  conductor  [syn:  {electrical  energy}] 
  3:  keen  and  shared  excitement;  "the  stage  crackled  with 
  electricity  whenever  she  was  on  it" 
 
  From  THE  DEVIL'S  DICTIONARY  ((C)1911  Released  April  15  1993)  [devils]: 
 
  ELECTRICITY,  n.  The  power  that  causes  all  natural  phenomena  not  known 
  to  be  caused  by  something  else.  It  is  the  same  thing  as  lightning, 
  and  its  famous  attempt  to  strike  Dr  Franklin  is  one  of  the  most 
  picturesque  incidents  in  that  great  and  good  man's  career.  The  memory 
  of  Dr  Franklin  is  justly  held  in  great  reverence,  particularly  in 
  France,  where  a  waxen  effigy  of  him  was  recently  on  exhibition, 
  bearing  the  following  touching  account  of  his  life  and  services  to 
  science: 
 
  "Monsieur  Franqulin,  inventor  of  electricity.  This 
  illustrious  savant,  after  having  made  several  voyages  around  the 
  world,  died  on  the  Sandwich  Islands  and  was  devoured  by  savages, 
  of  whom  not  a  single  fragment  was  ever  recovered." 
 
  Electricity  seems  destined  to  play  a  most  important  part  in  the 
  arts  and  industries.  The  question  of  its  economical  application  to 
  some  purposes  is  still  unsettled,  but  experiment  has  already  proved 
  that  it  will  propel  a  street  car  better  than  a  gas  jet  and  give  more 
  light  than  a  horse. 
 
 




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