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exploit

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exploit


  4  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Exploit  \Ex*ploit"\,  n.  [OE.  esploit  success,  OF  esploit, 
  espleit,revenue,  product,  vigor,  force,  exploit,  F.  exploit 
  exploit,  fr  L.  explicitum  prop.  p.  p.  neut.  of  explicare  to 
  unfold,  display,  exhibit;  ex  +  plicare  to  fold.  See  {Ply}, 
  and  cf  {Explicit},  {Explicate}.] 
  1.  A  deed  or  act  especially,  a  heroic  act  a  deed  of  renown; 
  an  adventurous  or  noble  achievement;  as  the  exploits  of 
  Alexander  the  Great. 
 
  Ripe  for  exploits  and  mighty  enterprises.  --Shak. 
 
  2.  Combat;  war.  [Obs.] 
 
  He  made  haste  to  exploit  some  warlike  service. 
  --Holland. 
 
  2.  [F.  exploiter.]  To  utilize;  to  make  available;  to  get  the 
  value  or  usefulness  out  of  as  to  exploit  a  mine  or 
  agricultural  lands;  to  exploit  public  opinion.  [Recent] 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  exploit 
  n  :  a  notable  achievement:  "the  book  was  her  finest  effort" 
  [syn:  {deed},  {feat},  {effort}] 
  v  1:  use  to  one's  advantage;  "He  exploit  the  new  taxation  system" 
  2:  draw  from  make  good  use  of  (resources)  [syn:  {tap}] 
  3:  work  excessively  hard  [syn:  {overwork}] 
 
  From  Jargon  File  (4.2.3,  23  NOV  2000)  [jargon]: 
 
  exploit  n.  [originally  cracker  slang]  1.  A  vulnerability  in 
  software  that  can  be  used  for  breaking  security  or  otherwise  attacking 
  an  Internet  host  over  the  network.  The  {Ping  O'  Death}  is  a  famous 
  exploit.  2.  More  grammatically,  a  program  that  exploits  an  exploit  in 
  sense  1, 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  exploit 
 
    A  security  hole  or  an  instance  of  taking  advantage 
  of  a  security  hole. 
 
  "[...]  {hackers}  say  exploit.  {sysadmin}s  say  hole" 
  --  {Mike  Emke  (http://emke.com/)} 
 
  Emke  reports  that  the  stress  is  on  the  second  syllable.  If 
  this  is  true,  this  may  be  a  case  of  of  hackerly  zero-deriving 
  verbs  (especially  instatials)  from  nouns,  akin  to  write"  as  a 
  noun  to  describe  an  instance  of  a  disk  drive  writing  to  a 
  disk. 
 
  (1997-01-31) 
 
 




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