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feature

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feature


  4  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Feature  \Fea"ture\  (?;  135),  n.  [OE.  feture  form  shape, 
  feature,  OF  faiture  fashion,  make  fr  L.  factura  a  making, 
  formation,  fr  facere  factum,  to  make  See  {Feat},  {Fact}, 
  and  cf  {Facture}.] 
  1.  The  make  form  or  outward  appearance  of  a  person;  the 
  whole  turn  or  style  of  the  body;  esp.,  good  appearance. 
 
  What  needeth  it  his  feature  to  descrive?  --Chaucer. 
 
  Cheated  of  feature  by  dissembling  nature.  --Shak. 
 
  2.  The  make  cast,  or  appearance  of  the  human  face,  and 
  especially  of  any  single  part  of  the  face;  a  lineament. 
  (pl.)  The  face,  the  countenance. 
 
  It  is  for  homely  features  to  keep  home.  --Milton. 
 
  3.  The  cast  or  structure  of  anything  or  of  any  part  of  a 
  thing  as  of  a  landscape,  a  picture,  a  treaty,  or  an 
  essay;  any  marked  peculiarity  or  characteristic;  as  one 
  of  the  features  of  the  landscape. 
 
  And  to  her  service  bind  each  living  creature  Through 
  secret  understanding  of  their  feature.  --Spenser. 
 
  4.  A  form  a  shape.  [R.] 
 
  So  scented  the  grim  feature,  and  upturned  His 
  nostril  wide  into  the  murky  air.  --Milton. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  feature 
  n  1:  a  prominent  aspect  of  something:  "the  map  showed  roads  and 
  other  features";  "generosity  is  one  of  his  best 
  characteristics"  [syn:  {characteristic}] 
  2:  the  characteristics  parts  of  a  person's  face:  eyes  and  nose 
  and  mouth  and  chin;  "an  expression  of  pleasure  crossed  his 
  features";  "his  lineaments  were  very  regular"  [syn:  {lineament}] 
  3:  the  principal  (full-length)  film  in  a  program  at  a  movie 
  theater;  "the  feature  tonight  is  `Casablanca'"  [syn:  {feature 
  film}] 
  4:  a  special  or  prominent  article  in  a  newspaper  or  magazine; 
  "they  ran  a  feature  on  retirement  planning"  [syn:  {feature 
  article}] 
  5:  an  article  of  merchandise  that  is  displayed  or  advertised 
  more  than  other  articles 
  v  1:  have  as  a  feature;  "This  restaurant  features  the  most  famous 
  chefs  in  France"  [syn:  {have}]  [ant:  {miss}] 
  2:  wear  or  display  in  an  ostentatious  or  proud  manner;  "she  was 
  sporting  a  new  hat"  [syn:  {sport},  {boast}] 
 
  From  Jargon  File  (4.2.3,  23  NOV  2000)  [jargon]: 
 
  feature  n.  1.  [common]  A  good  property  or  behavior  (as  of  a 
  program).  Whether  it  was  intended  or  not  is  immaterial.  2.  [common] 
  An  intended  property  or  behavior  (as  of  a  program).  Whether  it  is  good 
  or  not  is  immaterial  (but  if  bad  it  is  also  a  {misfeature}).  3.  A 
  surprising  property  or  behavior;  in  particular,  one  that  is  purposely 
  inconsistent  because  it  works  better  that  way  --  such  an  inconsistency  is 
  therefore  a  {feature}  and  not  a  {bug}.  This  kind  of  feature  is  sometimes 
  called  a  {miswart};  see  that  entry  for  a  classic  example.  4.  A  property 
  or  behavior  that  is  gratuitous  or  unnecessary,  though  perhaps  also 
  impressive  or  cute.  For  example,  one  feature  of  Common  LISP's  `format' 
  function  is  the  ability  to  print  numbers  in  two  different  Roman-numeral 
  formats  (see  {bells  whistles  and  gongs}).  5.  A  property  or  behavior  that 
  was  put  in  to  help  someone  else  but  that  happens  to  be  in  your  way  6. 
  [common]  A  bug  that  has  been  documented.  To  call  something  a  feature 
  sometimes  means  the  author  of  the  program  did  not  consider  the 
  particular  case,  and  that  the  program  responded  in  a  way  that  was 
  unexpected  but  not  strictly  incorrect.  A  standard  joke  is  that  a  bug  can 
  be  turned  into  a  {feature}  simply  by  documenting  it  (then  theoretically 
  no  one  can  complain  about  it  because  it's  in  the  manual),  or  even  by 
  simply  declaring  it  to  be  good.  "That's  not  a  bug,  that's  a  feature!"  is 
  a  common  catchphrase.  See  also  {feetch  feetch},  {creeping  featurism}, 
  {wart},  {green  lightning}. 
 
  The  relationship  among  bugs,  features,  misfeatures,  warts,  and 
  miswarts  might  be  clarified  by  the  following  hypothetical  exchange 
  between  two  hackers  on  an  airliner: 
 
  A:  "This  seat  doesn't  recline." 
 
  B:  "That's  not  a  bug,  that's  a  feature.  There  is  an  emergency 
  exit  door  built  around  the  window  behind  you  and  the  route  has  to  be 
  kept  clear." 
 
  A:  "Oh.  Then  it's  a  misfeature;  they  should  have  increased  the 
  spacing  between  rows  here." 
 
  B:  "Yes.  But  if  they'd  increased  spacing  in  only  one  section  it 
  would  have  been  a  wart  --  they  would've  had  to  make  nonstandard-length 
  ceiling  panels  to  fit  over  the  displaced  seats." 
 
  A:  "A  miswart,  actually.  If  they  increased  spacing  throughout 
  they'd  lose  several  rows  and  a  chunk  out  of  the  profit  margin.  So  unequal 
  spacing  would  actually  be  the  Right  Thing." 
 
  B:  "Indeed." 
 
  `Undocumented  feature'  is  a  common,  allegedly  humorous  euphemism 
  for  a  {bug}.  There's  a  related  joke  that  is  sometimes  referred  to  as  the 
  "one-question  geek  test".  You  say  to  someone  "I  saw  a  Volkswagen  Beetle 
  today  with  a  vanity  license  plate  that  read  FEATURE".  If  he/she  laughs, 
  he/she  is  a  geek  (see  {computer  geek},  sense  2). 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  feature 
 
    1.  A  good  property  or  behaviour  (as  of  a  program). 
  Whether  it  was  intended  or  not  is  immaterial. 
 
  2.  An  intended  property  or  behaviour  (as  of  a  program). 
  Whether  it  is  good  or  not  is  immaterial  (but  if  bad  it  is 
  also  a  {misfeature}). 
 
  3.  A  surprising  property  or  behaviour;  in  particular,  one  that 
  is  purposely  inconsistent  because  it  works  better  that  way  - 
  such  an  inconsistency  is  therefore  a  {feature}  and  not  a 
  {bug}.  This  kind  of  feature  is  sometimes  called  a  {miswart}. 
 
  4.  A  property  or  behaviour  that  is  gratuitous  or  unnecessary, 
  though  perhaps  also  impressive  or  cute.  For  example,  one 
  feature  of  {Common  LISP}'s  format"  function  is  the  ability  to 
  print  numbers  in  two  different  Roman-numeral  formats  (see 
  {bells,  whistles,  and  gongs}). 
 
  5.  A  property  or  behaviour  that  was  put  in  to  help  someone 
  else  but  that  happens  to  be  in  your  way 
 
  6.  A  bug  that  has  been  documented.  To  call  something  a 
  feature  sometimes  means  the  author  of  the  program  did  not 
  consider  the  particular  case,  and  that  the  program  responded 
  in  a  way  that  was  unexpected  but  not  strictly  incorrect.  A 
  standard  joke  is  that  a  bug  can  be  turned  into  a  {feature} 
  simply  by  documenting  it  (then  theoretically  no  one  can 
  complain  about  it  because  it's  in  the  manual),  or  even  by 
  simply  declaring  it  to  be  good.  "That's  not  a  bug,  that's  a 
  feature!"  is  a  common  catch-phrase.  Apparently  there  is  a 
  Volkswagen  Beetle  in  San  Francisco  whose  license  plate  reads 
  "FEATURE". 
 
  See  also  {feetch  feetch},  {creeping  featurism},  {wart},  {green 
  lightning}. 
 
  The  relationship  among  bugs,  features,  misfeatures,  warts  and 
  miswarts  might  be  clarified  by  the  following  hypothetical 
  exchange  between  two  hackers  on  an  airliner: 
 
  A:  "This  seat  doesn't  recline." 
 
  B:  "That's  not  a  bug,  that's  a  feature.  There  is  an  emergency 
  exit  door  built  around  the  window  behind  you  and  the  route 
  has  to  be  kept  clear." 
 
  A:  "Oh.  Then  it's  a  misfeature;  they  should  have  increased 
  the  spacing  between  rows  here." 
 
  B:  "Yes.  But  if  they'd  increased  spacing  in  only  one  section 
  it  would  have  been  a  wart  -  they  would've  had  to  make 
  nonstandard-length  ceiling  panels  to  fit  over  the  displaced 
  seats." 
 
  A:  "A  miswart,  actually.  If  they  increased  spacing  throughout 
  they'd  lose  several  rows  and  a  chunk  out  of  the  profit  margin. 
  So  unequal  spacing  would  actually  be  the  Right  Thing." 
 
  B:  "Indeed." 
 
  "Undocumented  feature"  is  a  common  euphemism  for  a  {bug}. 
 
  7.  An  attribute  or  function  of  a  {class}  in  {Eiffel}. 
 
  [{Jargon  File}] 
 
  (1995-10-22) 
 
 




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