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fetch

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fetch


  5  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  fetch  \fetch\,  v.  i. 
  To  bring  one's  self  to  make  headway;  to  veer;  as  to  fetch 
  about  to  fetch  to  windward.  --Totten. 
 
  {To  fetch  away}  (Naut.),  to  break  loose;  to  roll  slide  to 
  leeward. 
 
  {To  fetch  and  carry},  to  serve  obsequiously,  like  a  trained 
  spaniel. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Fetch  \Fetch\  (?;  224),  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Fetched}  2;  p.  pr 
  &  vb  n..  {Fetching}.]  [OE.  fecchen,  AS  feccan  perh.  the 
  same  word  as  fetian;  or  cf  facian  to  wish  to  get  OFries 
  faka  to  prepare.  [root]  77.  Cf  {Fet},  v.  t.] 
  1.  To  bear  toward  the  person  speaking,  or  the  person  or  thing 
  from  whose  point  of  view  the  action  is  contemplated;  to  go 
  and  bring  to  get 
 
  Time  will  run  back  and  fetch  the  age  of  gold. 
  --Milton. 
 
  He  called  to  her  and  said  Fetch  me  I  pray  thee,  a 
  little  water  in  a  vessel,  that  I  may  drink.  And  as 
  she  was  going  to  fetch  it  he  called  to  her  and 
  said  Bring  me  I  pray  thee,  a  morsel  of  bred  in 
  thine  hand.  --1  Kings 
  xvii.  11,  12. 
 
  2.  To  obtain  as  price  or  equivalent;  to  sell  for 
 
  Our  native  horses  were  held  in  small  esteem,  and 
  fetched  low  prices.  --Macaulay. 
 
  3.  To  recall  from  a  swoon;  to  revive;  --  sometimes  with  to 
  as  to  fetch  a  man  to 
 
  Fetching  men  again  when  they  swoon.  --Bacon. 
 
  4.  To  reduce;  to  throw. 
 
  The  sudden  trip  in  wrestling  that  fetches  a  man  to 
  the  ground.  --South. 
 
  5.  To  bring  to  accomplishment;  to  achieve;  to  make  to 
  perform,  with  certain  objects;  as  to  fetch  a  compass;  to 
  fetch  a  leap;  to  fetch  a  sigh. 
 
  I'll  fetch  a  turn  about  the  garden.  --Shak. 
 
  He  fetches  his  blow  quick  and  sure  --South. 
 
  6.  To  bring  or  get  within  reach  by  going;  to  reach;  to  arrive 
  at  to  attain;  to  reach  by  sailing. 
 
  Meantine  flew  our  ships,  and  straight  we  fetched  The 
  siren's  isle.  --Chapman. 
 
  7.  To  cause  to  come  to  bring  to  a  particular  state. 
 
  They  could  n't  fetch  the  butter  in  the  churn.  --W. 
  Barnes. 
 
  {To  fetch  a  compass}  (Naut.),  to  make  a  sircuit;  to  take  a 
  circuitious  route  going  to  a  place 
 
  {To  fetch  a  pump},  to  make  it  draw  water  by  pouring  water 
  into  the  top  and  working  the  handle. 
 
  {To  fetch}  {headway  or  sternway}  (Naut.),  to  move  ahead  or 
  astern. 
 
  {To  fetch  out},  to  develop.  ``The  skill  of  the  polisher 
  fetches  out  the  colors  [of  marble]''  --Addison. 
 
  {To  fetch  up}. 
  a  To  overtake.  [Obs.]  ``Says  [the  hare],  I  can  fetch  up 
  the  tortoise  when  I  please.''  --L'Estrange. 
  b  To  stop  suddenly. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Fetch  \Fetch\,  n. 
  1.  A  stratagem  by  which  a  thing  is  indirectly  brought  to 
  pass,  or  by  which  one  thing  seems  intended  and  another  is 
  done  a  trick;  an  artifice. 
 
  Every  little  fetch  of  wit  and  criticism.  --South. 
 
  2.  The  apparation  of  a  living  person;  a  wraith. 
 
  The  very  fetch  and  ghost  of  Mrs.  Gamp.  --Dickens. 
 
  {Fetch  candle},  a  light  seen  at  night,  superstitiously 
  believed  to  portend  a  person's  death. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  fetch 
  v  1:  bring  or  fetch;  "Get  me  those  books  over  there  please"; 
  "Could  you  bring  over  the  wine?";  "The  dog  fetched  the 
  hat"  [syn:  {bring},  {get},  {convey}]  [ant:  {take  away}] 
  2:  attract  or  elicit;  "The  school  attracts  students  with 
  artistic  talents";  "His  playing  drew  a  crowd"  [syn:  {attract}, 
  {pull},  {pull  in},  {draw},  {draw  in}] 
  3:  be  sold  for  a  certain  price;  "The  painting  brought  $10,000"; 
  "The  old  print  fetched  a  high  price  at  the  auction"  [syn: 
  {bring  in},  {bring}] 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  Fetch 
 
  A  {Macintosh}  program  by  Jim  Matthews   
  for  transferring  files  using  {File  Transfer  Protocol}  (FTP). 
  Fetch  requires  a  Mac  512KE,  System  4.1,  and  either  {KSP}  1.03 
  or  {MacTCP}. 
 
  Current  version:  2.1.2. 
 
  Fetch  is  Copyright  1992,  Trustees  of  Dartmouth  College. 
 
  {(ftp://ftp.Dartmouth.edu/pub/mac/Fetch_2.1.2.sit.hqx)}. 
  {(ftp://src.doc.ic.ac.uk/computing/systems/mac/info-mac/comm/tcp)}. 
 
  (1994-11-30) 
 
 




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