browse words by letter
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
fossil

more about fossil

fossil


  7  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Fossil  \Fos"sil\,  n. 
  1.  A  substance  dug  from  the  earth.  [Obs.] 
 
  Note:  Formerly  all  minerals  were  called  fossils,  but  the  word 
  is  now  restricted  to  express  the  remains  of  animals  and 
  plants  found  buried  in  the  earth.  --Ure. 
 
  2.  (Paleon.)  The  remains  of  an  animal  or  plant  found  in 
  stratified  rocks.  Most  fossils  belong  to  extinct  species, 
  but  many  of  the  later  ones  belong  to  species  still  living. 
 
  3.  A  person  whose  views  and  opinions  are  extremely 
  antiquated;  one  whose  sympathies  are  with  a  former  time 
  rather  than  with  the  present.  [Colloq.] 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Fossil  \Fos"sil\,  a.  [L.  fossilis,  fr  fodere  to  dig:  cf  F. 
  fossile.  See  {Fosse}.] 
  1.  Dug  out  of  the  earth;  as  fossil  coal;  fossil  salt. 
 
  2.  (Paleon.)  Like  or  pertaining  to  fossils;  contained  in 
  rocks,  whether  petrified  or  not  as  fossil  plants, 
  shells. 
 
  {Fossil  copal},  a  resinous  substance,  first  found  in  the  blue 
  clay  at  Highgate  near  London,  and  apparently  a  vegetable 
  resin,  partly  changed  by  remaining  in  the  earth. 
 
  {Fossil  cork},  {flax},  {paper},  or  {wood},  varieties  of 
  amianthus. 
 
  {Fossil  farina},  a  soft  carbonate  of  lime. 
 
  {Fossil  ore},  fossiliferous  red  hematite.  --Raymond. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  fossil 
  n  1:  (informal)  someone  whose  style  is  out  of  fashion  [syn:  {dodo}, 
  {fogy},  {fogey},  {dotard}] 
  2:  a  relic  or  impression  of  a  plant  or  animal  that  existed  in  a 
  past  geological  age  [syn:  {archeological  remains}] 
 
  From  U.S.  Gazetteer  (1990)  [gazetteer]: 
 
  Fossil,  OR  (city,  FIPS  26650) 
  Location:  44.99841  N,  120.21319  W 
  Population  (1990):  399  (224  housing  units) 
  Area:  2.0  sq  km  (land),  0.0  sq  km  (water) 
 
  From  Jargon  File  (4.2.3,  23  NOV  2000)  [jargon]: 
 
  fossil  n.  1.  In  software,  a  misfeature  that  becomes 
  understandable  only  in  historical  context,  as  a  remnant  of  times  past 
  retained  so  as  not  to  break  compatibility.  Example:  the  retention  of 
  octal  as  default  base  for  string  escapes  in  {C},  in  spite  of  the  better 
  match  of  hexadecimal  to  ASCII  and  modern  byte-addressable  architectures. 
  See  {dusty  deck}.  2.  More  restrictively,  a  feature  with  past  but  no 
  present  utility.  Example:  the  force-all-caps  (LCASE)  bits  in  the  V7  and 
  {BSD}  Unix  tty  driver,  designed  for  use  with  monocase  terminals.  (In  a 
  perversion  of  the  usual  backward-compatibility  goal,  this  functionality 
  has  actually  been  expanded  and  renamed  in  some  later  {USG  Unix}  releases 
  as  the  IUCLC  and  OLCUC  bits.)  3.  The  FOSSIL  (Fido/Opus/Seadog  Standard 
  Interface  Level)  driver  specification  for  serial-port  access  to  replace 
  the  {brain-dead}  routines  in  the  IBM  PC  ROMs.  Fossils  are  used  by  most 
  MS-DOS  {BBS}  software  in  preference  to  the  `supported'  ROM  routines, 
  which  do  not  support  interrupt-driven  operation  or  setting  speeds  above 
  9600;  the  use  of  a  semistandard  FOSSIL  library  is  preferable  to  the  {bare 
  metal}  serial  port  programming  otherwise  required.  Since  the  FOSSIL 
  specification  allows  additional  functionality  to  be  hooked  in  drivers 
  that  use  the  {hook}  but  do  not  provide  serial-port  access  themselves 
  are  named  with  a  modifier,  as  in  `video  fossil'. 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  fossil 
 
  1.  In  software,  a  misfeature  that  becomes  understandable  only 
  in  historical  context,  as  a  remnant  of  times  past  retained  so 
  as  not  to  break  compatibility.  Example:  the  retention  of 
  {octal}  as  default  base  for  string  escapes  in  {C},  in  spite  of 
  the  better  match  of  {hexadecimal}  to  ASCII  and  modern 
  byte-addressable  architectures.  See  {dusty  deck}. 
 
  2.  More  restrictively,  a  feature  with  past  but  no  present 
  utility.  Example:  the  force-all-caps  (LCASE)  bits  in  the  V7 
  and  {BSD}  Unix  tty  driver,  designed  for  use  with  monocase 
  terminals.  (In  a  perversion  of  the  usual 
  backward-compatibility  goal,  this  functionality  has  actually 
  been  expanded  and  renamed  in  some  later  {USG  Unix}  releases  as 
  the  IUCLC  and  OLCUC  bits.) 
 
  3.  The  FOSSIL  (Fido/Opus/Seadog  Standard  Interface  Level) 
  driver  specification  for  serial-port  access  to  replace  the 
  {brain-dead}  routines  in  the  IBM  PC  ROMs.  Fossils  are  used  by 
  most  {MS-DOS}  {BBS}  software  in  preference  to  the  supported" 
  ROM  routines,  which  do  not  support  interrupt-driven  operation 
  or  setting  speeds  above  9600;  the  use  of  a  semistandard  FOSSIL 
  library  is  preferable  to  the  {bare  metal}  serial  port 
  programming  otherwise  required.  Since  the  FOSSIL 
  specification  allows  additional  functionality  to  be  hooked  in 
  drivers  that  use  the  {hook}  but  do  not  provide  serial-port 
  access  themselves  are  named  with  a  modifier,  as  in  "video 
  fossil". 
 
  [{Jargon  File}] 
 
 
 
  From  V.E.R.A.  --  Virtual  Entity  of  Relevant  Acronyms  13  March  2001  [vera]: 
 
  FOSSIL 
  Fido  Opus  Seadog  Standard  Interface  Layer 
 
 




more about fossil