browse words by letter
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
freeze

more about freeze

freeze


  8  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Freeze  \Freeze\,  v.  t. 
 
  {To  freeze  out},  to  drive  out  or  exclude  by  cold  or  by  cold 
  treatment;  to  force  to  withdraw;  as  to  be  frozen  out  of 
  one's  room  in  winter;  to  freeze  out  a  competitor. 
  [Colloq.] 
 
  A  railroad  which  had  a  London  connection  must  not  be 
  allowed  to  freeze  out  one  that  had  no  such 
  connection.  --A.  T. 
  Hadley. 
 
  It  is  sometimes  a  long  time  before  a  player  who  is 
  frozen  out  can  get  into  a  game  again  --R.  F. 
  Foster. 
  Freiherr  \Frei"herr`\,  n.;  pl  {Freiherrn}.  [G.,  lit.,  free 
  lord.] 
  In  Germany  and  Austria,  a  baron. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Freeze  \Freeze\,  v.  t. 
  1.  To  congeal;  to  harden  into  ice;  to  convert  from  a  fluid  to 
  a  solid  form  by  cold,  or  abstraction  of  heat. 
 
  2.  To  cause  loss  of  animation  or  life  in  from  lack  of  heat; 
  to  give  the  sensation  of  cold  to  to  chill. 
 
  A  faint,  cold  fear  runs  through  my  veins,  That 
  almost  freezes  up  the  heat  of  life.  --Shak. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Freeze  \Freeze\,  n. 
  The  act  of  congealing,  or  the  state  of  being  congealed. 
  [Colloq.] 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Freeze  \Freeze\,  n.  (Arch.) 
  A  frieze.  [Obs.] 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Freeze  \Freeze\,  v.  i.  [imp.  {Froze};  p.  p.  {Frozen};  p.  pr  & 
  vb  n.  {Freezing}.]  [OE.  fresen,  freosen  AS  fre['o]san; 
  akin  to  D.  vriezen  OHG.  iosan,  G.  frieren  Icel.  frjsa  Sw 
  frysa  Dan.  fryse,  Goth.  frius  cold,  frost,  and  prob.  to  L. 
  prurire  to  itch,  E.  prurient,  cf  L.  prna  a  burning  coal, 
  pruina  hoarfrost,  Skr.  prushv[=a]  ice,  prush  to  spirt.  ?  18. 
  Cf  {Frost}.] 
  1.  To  become  congealed  by  cold;  to  be  changed  from  a  liquid 
  to  a  solid  state  by  the  abstraction  of  heat;  to  be 
  hardened  into  ice  or  a  like  solid  body. 
 
  Note:  Water  freezes  at  32[deg]  above  zero  by  Fahrenheit's 
  thermometer;  mercury  freezes  at  40[deg]  below  zero. 
 
  2.  To  become  chilled  with  cold,  or  as  with  cold;  to  suffer 
  loss  of  animation  or  life  by  lack  of  heat;  as  the  blood 
  freezes  in  the  veins. 
 
  {To  freeze  up}  (Fig.),  to  become  formal  and  cold  in  demeanor. 
  [Colloq.] 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  freeze 
  n  1:  the  withdrawal  of  hear  to  change  something  from  a  liquid  to 
  a  solid  [syn:  {freezing}] 
  2:  weather  cold  enough  to  cause  freezing  [syn:  {frost}] 
  3:  an  interruption  or  temporary  suspension  of  progress  or 
  movement:  "a  halt  in  the  arms  race";  "a  nuclear  freeze" 
  [syn:  {halt}] 
  4:  fixing  (of  prices  or  wages  etc)  at  a  particular  level:  "a 
  freeze  on  hiring" 
  v  1:  stop  moving  or  become  immobilized;  "When  he  saw  the  police 
  car  he  froze"  [syn:  {stop  dead}] 
  2:  change  to  ice;  "The  water  in  the  bowl  froze"  [ant:  {boil}] 
  3:  be  cold;  "I  could  freeze  to  death  in  this  office  when  the 
  air  conditioning  is  turned  on" 
  4:  cause  to  freeze;  "Freeze  the  leftover  food" 
  5:  stop  a  process  or  a  habit  by  imposing  a  freeze  on  it 
  "Suspend  the  aid  to  the  war-torn  country"  [syn:  {suspend}] 
  6:  be  very  cold,  below  the  freezing  point;  "It  is  freezing  in 
  Kalamazoo" 
  7:  change  from  a  liquid  to  a  solid  when  cold;  "Water  freezes  at 
  32  degrees  Fahrenheit"  [syn:  {freeze  out},  {freeze  down}] 
  8:  prohibit  the  conversion  or  use  of  (assets);  "Blocked  funds"; 
  "Freeze  the  assets  of  this  hostile  government"  [syn:  {block}, 
  {immobilize}]  [ant:  {unblock},  {unblock}] 
  9:  anesthetize  by  cold,  as  for  certain  surgical  procedures 
  10:  behave  cold  and  formally 
 
  From  Jargon  File  (4.2.3,  23  NOV  2000)  [jargon]: 
 
  freeze  v.  To  lock  an  evolving  software  distribution  or 
  document  against  changes  so  it  can  be  released  with  some  hope  of 
  stability.  Carries  the  strong  implication  that  the  item  in  question 
  will  `unfreeze'  at  some  future  date.  "OK,  fix  that  bug  and  we'll  freeze 
  for  release." 
 
  There  are  more  specific  constructions  on  this  term.  A  `feature 
  freeze',  for  example,  locks  out  modifications  intended  to  introduce  new 
  features  but  still  allows  bugfixes  and  completion  of  existing  features; 
  a  `code  freeze'  connotes  no  more  changes  at  all  At  Sun  Microsystems 
  and  elsewhere,  one  may  also  hear  references  to  `code  slush'  --  that  is 
  an  almost-but-not-quite  frozen  state. 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  freeze 
 
  To  lock  an  evolving  software  distribution  or  document  against 
  changes  so  it  can  be  released  with  some  hope  of  stability. 
  Carries  the  strong  implication  that  the  item  in  question  will 
  unfreeze"  at  some  future  date. 
 
  There  are  more  specific  constructions  on  this  term.  A 
  "feature  freeze",  for  example,  locks  out  modifications 
  intended  to  introduce  new  features  but  still  allows  bugfixes 
  and  completion  of  existing  features;  a  "code  freeze"  connotes 
  no  more  changes  at  all  At  {Sun  Microsystems}  and  elsewhere, 
  one  may  also  hear  references  to  "code  slush"  -  that  is  an 
  almost-but-not-quite  frozen  state. 
 
  [{Jargon  File}] 
 
 




more about freeze