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frost

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frost


  5  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Frost  \Frost\,  n.  [OE.  frost,  forst,  AS  forst,  frost.  fr 
  fre['o]san  to  freeze;  akin  to  D.  varst,  G.,  OHG.,  Icel., 
  Dan.,  &  Sw  frost.  [root]18.  See  {Freeze},  v.  i.] 
  1.  The  act  of  freezing;  --  applied  chiefly  to  the  congelation 
  of  water;  congelation  of  fluids. 
 
  2.  The  state  or  temperature  of  the  air  which  occasions 
  congelation,  or  the  freezing  of  water;  severe  cold  or 
  freezing  weather. 
 
  The  third  bay  comes  a  frost,  a  killing  frost. 
  --Shak. 
 
  3.  Frozen  dew;  --  called  also  {hoarfrost}  or  {white  frost}. 
 
  He  scattereth  the  frost  like  ashes.  --Ps.  cxlvii 
  16. 
 
  4.  Coldness  or  insensibility;  severity  or  rigidity  of 
  character.  [R.] 
 
  It  was  of  those  moments  of  intense  feeling  when  the 
  frost  of  the  Scottish  people  melts  like  a  snow 
  wreath.  --Sir  W. 
  Scott. 
 
  {Black  frost},  cold  so  intense  as  to  freeze  vegetation  and 
  cause  it  to  turn  black,  without  the  formation  of 
  hoarfrost. 
 
  {Frost  bearer}  (Physics),  a  philosophical  instrument 
  illustrating  the  freezing  of  water  in  a  vacuum;  a 
  cryophous. 
 
  {Frost  grape}  (Bot.),  an  American  grape,  with  very  small 
  acid  berries. 
 
  {Frost  lamp},  a  lamp  placed  below  the  oil  tube  of  an  Argand 
  lamp  to  keep  the  oil  limpid  on  cold  nights;  --  used 
  especially  in  lighthouses.  --Knight. 
 
  {Frost  nail},  a  nail  with  a  sharp  head  driven  into  a  horse's 
  shoe  to  keen  him  from  slipping. 
 
  {Frost  smoke},  an  appearance  resembling  smoke,  caused  by 
  congelation  of  vapor  in  the  atmosphere  in  time  of  severe 
  cold. 
 
  The  brig  and  the  ice  round  her  are  covered  by  a 
  strange  black  obscurity:  it  is  the  frost  smoke  of 
  arctic  winters.  --Kane. 
 
  {Frost  valve},  a  valve  to  drain  the  portion  of  a  pipe, 
  hydrant,  pump,  etc.,  where  water  would  be  liable  to 
  freeze. 
 
  {Jack  Frost},  a  popular  personification  of  frost. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Frost  \Frost\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Frostted};  p.  pr  &  vb  n. 
  {Frosting}.] 
  1.  To  injure  by  frost;  to  freeze,  as  plants. 
 
  2.  To  cover  with  hoarfrost;  to  produce  a  surface  resembling 
  frost  upon  as  upon  cake,  metals,  or  glass. 
 
  While  with  a  hoary  light  she  frosts  the  ground. 
  --Wordsworth. 
 
  3.  To  roughen  or  sharpen,  as  the  nail  heads  or  calks  of 
  horseshoes,  so  as  to  fit  them  for  frosty  weather. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  frost 
  n  1:  ice  crystals  forming  a  white  deposit  (especially  on  objects 
  outside)  [syn:  {hoar},  {hoarfrost},  {rime}] 
  2:  weather  cold  enough  to  cause  freezing  [syn:  {freeze}] 
  3:  the  formation  of  frost  or  ice  on  a  surface  [syn:  {icing}] 
  4:  US  poet  famous  for  his  lyrical  poems  on  country  life  in  New 
  England  (1874-1963)  [syn:  {Frost},  {Robert  Frost},  {Robert 
  Lee  Frost}] 
  v  :  decorate  with  frosting;  "frost  a  cake"  [syn:  {ice}] 
 
  From  U.S.  Gazetteer  (1990)  [gazetteer]: 
 
  Frost,  MN  (city,  FIPS  22940) 
  Location:  43.58372  N,  93.92537  W 
  Population  (1990):  236  (115  housing  units) 
  Area:  1.4  sq  km  (land),  0.0  sq  km  (water) 
  Zip  code(s):  56033 
  Frost,  TX  (town,  FIPS  27768) 
  Location:  32.07815  N,  96.80796  W 
  Population  (1990):  579  (259  housing  units) 
  Area:  2.9  sq  km  (land),  0.0  sq  km  (water) 
  Zip  code(s):  76641 
 
  From  Easton's  1897  Bible  Dictionary  [easton]: 
 
  Frost 
  (Heb.  kerah,  from  its  smoothness)  Job  37:10  (R.V.,  "ice");  Gen. 
  31:40;  Jer.  36:30;  rendered  ice"  in  Job  6:16,  38:29;  and 
  crystal"  in  Ezek.  1:22.  "At  the  present  day  frost  is  entirely 
  unknown  in  the  lower  portions  of  the  valley  of  the  Jordan,  but 
  slight  frosts  are  sometimes  felt  on  the  sea-coast  and  near 
  Lebanon."  Throughout  Western  Asia  cold  frosty  nights  are 
  frequently  succeeded  by  warm  days. 
 
  "Hoar  frost"  (Heb.  kephor,  so  called  from  its  covering  the 
  ground)  is  mentioned  in  Ex  16:14;  Job  38:29;  Ps  147:16. 
 
  In  Ps  78:47  the  word  rendered  frost"  (R.V.  marg.,  "great 
  hail-stones"),  _hanamal_,  occurs  only  there  It  is  rendered  by 
  Gesenius  the  Hebrew  lexicographer,  "ant,"  and  so  also  by 
  others  but  the  usual  interpretation  derived  from  the  ancient 
  versions  may  be  maintained. 
 




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