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habit

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habit


  4  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Habit  \Hab"it\n.  [OE.  habit,  abit  fr  habit  fr  L.  habitus 
  state,  appearance,  dress,  fr  habere  to  have  be  in  a 
  condition;  prob.  akin  to  E.  have  See  {Have},  and  cf  {Able}, 
  {Binnacle},  {Debt},  {Due},  {Exhibit},  {Malady.}] 
  1.  The  usual  condition  or  state  of  a  person  or  thing  either 
  natural  or  acquired,  regarded  as  something  had  possessed, 
  and  firmly  retained;  as  a  religious  habit;  his  habit  is 
  morose;  elms  have  a  spreading  habit;  esp.,  physical 
  temperament  or  constitution;  as  a  full  habit  of  body. 
 
  2.  (Biol.)  The  general  appearance  and  manner  of  life  of  a 
  living  organism. 
 
  3.  Fixed  or  established  custom;  ordinary  course  of  conduct; 
  practice;  usage;  hence  prominently,  the  involuntary 
  tendency  or  aptitude  to  perform  certain  actions  which  is 
  acquired  by  their  frequent  repetition;  as  habit  is  second 
  nature;  also  peculiar  ways  of  acting;  characteristic 
  forms  of  behavior. 
 
  A  man  of  very  shy,  retired  habits.  --W.  Irving. 
 
  4.  Outward  appearance;  attire;  dress;  hence  a  garment;  esp., 
  a  closely  fitting  garment  or  dress  worn  by  ladies;  as  a 
  riding  habit. 
 
  Costly  thy  habit  as  thy  purse  can  buy  --Shak. 
 
  There  are  among  the  states,  several  of  Venus,  in 
  different  habits.  --Addison. 
 
  Syn:  Practice;  mode;  manner;  way  custom;  fashion. 
 
  Usage:  {Habit},  {Custom.}  Habit  is  a  disposition  or  tendency 
  leading  us  to  do  easily,  naturally,  and  with  growing 
  certainty,  what  we  do  often  custom  is  external,  being 
  habitual  use  or  the  frequent  repetition  of  the  same 
  act  The  two  operate  reciprocally  on  each  other  The 
  custom  of  giving  produces  a  habit  of  liberality; 
  habits  of  devotion  promote  the  custom  of  going  to 
  church.  Custom  also  supposes  an  act  of  the  will 
  selecting  given  modes  of  procedure;  habit  is  a  law  of 
  our  being  a  kind  of  ``second  nature''  which  grows  up 
  within  us 
 
  How  use  doth  breed  a  habit  in  a  man  !  --Shak. 
 
  He  who  reigns  .  .  .  upheld  by  old  repute, 
 
  Consent,  or  custom.  --Milton. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Habit  \Hab"it\  (h[a^]b"[i^]t),  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Habited};  p. 
  pr  &  vb  n.  {Habiting}.]  [OE.  habiten  to  dwell,  F.  habiter, 
  fr  L.  habitare  to  have  frequently,  to  dwell,  intens.  fr 
  habere  to  have  See  {Habit},  n.] 
  1.  To  inhabit.  [Obs.] 
 
  In  thilke  places  as  they  [birds]  habiten.  --Rom.  of 
  R. 
 
  2.  To  dress;  to  clothe;  to  array. 
 
  They  habited  themselves  lite  those  rural  deities. 
  --Dryden. 
 
  3.  To  accustom;  to  habituate.  [Obs.]  Chapman. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  habit 
  n  1:  an  established  custom;  "it  was  their  habit  to  dine  at  7 
  every  evening"  [syn:  {wont}] 
  2:  a  pattern  of  behavior  acquired  through  frequent  repetition; 
  "she  had  a  habit  twirling  the  ends  of  her  hair";  "long  use 
  had  hardened  him  to  it"  [syn:  {use},  {wont}] 
  3:  a  distinctive  attire  (as  the  costume  of  a  religious  order) 
  4:  excessive  use  of  drugs  [syn:  {substance  abuse},  {drug  abuse}] 
  v  :  put  a  habit  on 
 
  From  THE  DEVIL'S  DICTIONARY  ((C)1911  Released  April  15  1993)  [devils]: 
 
  HABIT,  n.  A  shackle  for  the  free 
 
 




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