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heavyweight

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heavyweight


  3  definitions  found 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  heavyweight 
  adj  :  heaviest  in  a  category  or  of  a  heavyweight  category  (175+ 
  lbs  for  boxers);  "a  heavyweight  boxer" 
  n  1:  a  wrestler  who  weighs  more  than  214  pounds 
  2:  a  boxer  who  weighs  more  than  195  pounds 
  3:  a  very  large  person;  impressive  in  size  or  qualities  [syn:  {giant}, 
  {hulk},  {whale}] 
  4:  a  person  of  exceptional  importance  and  reputation  [syn:  {colossus}, 
  {behemoth},  {giant},  {titan}] 
 
  From  Jargon  File  (4.2.3,  23  NOV  2000)  [jargon]: 
 
  heavyweight  adj  [common]  High-overhead;  {baroque}; 
  code-intensive;  featureful  but  costly.  Esp.  used  of  communication 
  protocols,  language  designs,  and  any  sort  of  implementation  in  which 
  maximum  generality  and/or  ease  of  implementation  has  been  pushed  at  the 
  expense  of  mundane  considerations  such  as  speed,  memory  utilization, 
  and  startup  time.  {EMACS}  is  a  heavyweight  editor;  {X}  is  an  _extremely_ 
  heavyweight  window  system.  This  term  isn't  pejorative,  but  one  hacker's 
  heavyweight  is  another's  {elephantine}  and  a  third's  {monstrosity}. 
  Oppose  `lightweight'.  Usage:  now  borders  on  techspeak  especially  in 
  the  compound  `heavyweight  process'. 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  heavyweight 
 
  High-overhead;  {baroque};  code-intensive;  featureful  but 
  costly.  Especially  used  of  communication  protocols,  language 
  designs,  and  any  sort  of  implementation  in  which  maximum 
  generality  and/or  ease  of  implementation  has  been  pushed  at 
  the  expense  of  mundane  considerations  such  as  speed,  memory 
  use  and  startup  time.  {Emacs}  is  a  heavyweight  editor;  {X}  is 
  an  *extremely*  heavyweight  window  system.  This  term  isn't 
  pejorative,  but  one  hacker's  heavyweight  is  another's 
  {elephantine}  and  a  third's  monstrosity. 
 
  Opposite:  "lightweight".  Usage:  now  borders  on  technical 
  especially  in  the  compound  "heavyweight  process". 
 
  (1994-12-22) 
 
 




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