browse words by letter
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
hermes

more about hermes

hermes


  5  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Hermes  \Her"mes\,  n.  [L.,  fr  Gr  ?.] 
  1.  (Myth.)  See  {Mercury}. 
 
  Note:  Hermes  Trismegistus  [Gr.  'Ermh^s  trisme`gistos,  lit., 
  Hermes  thrice  greatest]  was  a  late  name  of  Hermes, 
  especially  as  identified  with  the  Egyptian  god  Thoth. 
  He  was  the  fabled  inventor  of  astrology  and  alchemy. 
 
  2.  (Arch[ae]ology)  Originally,  a  boundary  stone  dedicated  to 
  Hermes  as  the  god  of  boundaries,  and  therefore  bearing  in 
  some  cases  a  head,  or  head  and  shoulders,  placed  upon  a 
  quadrangular  pillar  whose  height  is  that  of  the  body 
  belonging  to  the  head,  sometimes  having  feet  or  other 
  parts  of  the  body  sculptured  upon  it  These  figures, 
  though  often  representing  Hermes,  were  used  for  other 
  divinities,  and  even  in  later  times,  for  portraits  of 
  human  beings.  Called  also  {herma}.  See  {Terminal  statue}, 
  under  {Terminal}. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  Hermes 
  n  :  (Greek  mythology)  messenger  and  herald  of  the  gods;  god  of 
  commerce  and  cunning  and  and  invention  and  theft; 
  identified  with  Roman  Mercury  [syn:  {Hermes}] 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  Hermes 
 
    An  experimental,  very  high  level,  integrated 
  language  and  system  from  the  {IBM}  {Watson  Research  Centre}, 
  produced  in  June  1990.  It  is  designed  for  implementation  of 
  large  systems  and  distributed  applications,  as  well  as  for 
  general-purpose  programming.  It  is  an  {imperative},  {strongly 
  typed}  and  {process-oriented}  successor  to  {NIL}. 
 
  Hermes  hides  distribution  and  heterogeneity  from  the 
  programmer.  The  programmer  sees  a  single  {abstract  machine} 
  containing  processes  that  communicate  using  calls  or  sends. 
  The  {compiler},  not  the  programmer,  deals  with  the  complexity 
  of  data  structure  layout,  local  and  remote  communication,  and 
  interaction  with  the  {operating  system}.  As  a  result,  Hermes 
  programs  are  portable  and  easy  to  write.  Because  the 
  programming  paradigm  is  simple  and  high  level,  there  are  many 
  opportunities  for  optimisation  which  are  not  present  in 
  languages  which  give  the  programmer  more  direct  control  over 
  the  machine. 
 
  Hermes  features  {threads},  {relational  table}sHermes  is 
  {typestate}  checking,  {capability}-based  access  and  {dynamic 
  configuration}. 
 
  Version  0.8alpha  patchlevel  01  runs  on  {RS/6000},  {Sun-4}, 
  {NeXT},  {IBM-RT}/{BSD4.3}  and  includes  a  {bytecode  compiler}, 
  a  bytecode->C  compiler  and  {run-time  support}. 
 
  {0.7alpha  for  Unix 
  (ftp://software.watson.ibm.com/pub/hermes)}. 
 
  E-mail:  ,  Andy  Lowry 
  . 
 
  {Usenet}  newsgroup:  {news:comp.lang.hermes}. 
 
  ["Hermes:  A  Language  for  Distributed  Computing".  Strom, 
  Bacon,  Goldberg  Lowry,  Yellin,  Yemini.  Prentice-Hall, 
  Englewood  Cliffs,  NJ  1991.  ISBN:  O-13-389537-8]. 
 
  (1992-03-22) 
 
 
 
  From  Easton's  1897  Bible  Dictionary  [easton]: 
 
  Hermes 
  Mercury,  a  Roman  Christian  (Rom.  16:14). 
 
 
  From  V.E.R.A.  --  Virtual  Entity  of  Relevant  Acronyms  13  March  2001  [vera]: 
 
  HERMES 
  Heuristic  Emergency  Response  Management  Expert  System  (XPS) 
 
 




more about hermes