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hove

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hove


  4  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Heave  \Heave\,  v.  t.  [imp.  {Heaved},  or  {Hove};  p.  p.  {Heaved}, 
  {Hove},  formerly  {Hoven};  p.  pr  &  vb  n.  {Heaving}.]  [OE. 
  heven,  hebben,  As  hebban;  akin  to  OS  hebbian,  D.  heffen 
  OHG.  heffan  hevan,  G.  heven,  Icel.  h["a]fva,  Dan.  h[ae]ve, 
  Goth.  hafjan  L.  capere  to  take  seize;  cf  Gr  ?  handle.  Cf 
  {Accept},  {Behoof},  {Capacious},  {Forceps},  {haft}, 
  {Receipt}.] 
  1.  To  cause  to  move  upward  or  onward  by  a  lifting  effort;  to 
  lift;  to  raise;  to  hoist;  --  often  with  up  as  the  wave 
  heaved  the  boat  on  land. 
 
  One  heaved  ahigh,  to  be  hurled  down  below.  --Shak. 
 
  Note:  Heave,  as  now  used  implies  that  the  thing  raised  is 
  heavy  or  hard  to  move  but  formerly  it  was  used  in  a 
  less  restricted  sense 
 
  Here  a  little  child  I  stand  Heaving  up  my  either 
  hand.  --Herrick. 
 
  2.  To  throw;  to  cast;  --  obsolete,  provincial,  or  colloquial, 
  except  in  certain  nautical  phrases;  as  to  heave  the  lead; 
  to  heave  the  log 
 
  3.  To  force  from  or  into  any  position;  to  cause  to  move 
  also  to  throw  off  --  mostly  used  in  certain  nautical 
  phrases;  as  to  heave  the  ship  ahead. 
 
  4.  To  raise  or  force  from  the  breast;  to  utter  with  effort; 
  as  to  heave  a  sigh. 
 
  The  wretched  animal  heaved  forth  such  groans. 
  --Shak. 
 
  5.  To  cause  to  swell  or  rise,  as  the  breast  or  bosom. 
 
  The  glittering,  finny  swarms  That  heave  our  friths, 
  and  crowd  upon  our  shores.  --Thomson. 
 
  {To  heave  a  cable  short}  (Naut.),  to  haul  in  cable  till  the 
  ship  is  almost  perpendicularly  above  the  anchor. 
 
  {To  heave  a  ship  ahead}  (Naut.),  to  warp  her  ahead  when  not 
  under  sail,  as  by  means  of  cables. 
 
  {To  heave  a  ship  down}  (Naut.),  to  throw  or  lay  her  down  on 
  one  side  to  careen  her 
 
  {To  heave  a  ship  to}  (Naut.),  to  bring  the  ship's  head  to  the 
  wind,  and  stop  her  motion. 
 
  {To  heave  about}  (Naut.),  to  put  about  suddenly. 
 
  {To  heave  in}  (Naut.),  to  shorten  (cable). 
 
  {To  heave  in  stays}  (Naut.),  to  put  a  vessel  on  the  other 
  tack. 
 
  {To  heave  out  a  sail}  (Naut.),  to  unfurl  it 
 
  {To  heave  taut}  (Naut.),  to  turn  a 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Hove  \Hove\, 
  imp.  &  p.  p.  of  {Heave}. 
 
  {Hove  short},  {Hove  to}.  See  {To  heave  a  cable  short},  {To 
  heave  a  ship  to},  etc.,  under  {Heave}. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Hove  \Hove\,  v.  i.  &  t. 
  To  rise;  to  swell;  to  heave;  to  cause  to  swell.  [Obs.  or 
  Scot.]  --Holland.  Burns. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Hove  \Hove\,  v.  i.  [OE.  hoven.  See  {Hover}.] 
  To  hover  around  to  loiter;  to  lurk.  [Obs.]  --Gower. 




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