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humility

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humility


  4  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Upland  \Up"land\,  a. 
  1.  Of  or  pertaining  to  uplands;  being  on  upland;  high  in 
  situation;  as  upland  inhabitants;  upland  pasturage. 
 
  Sometimes  with  secure  delight  The  upland  hamlets 
  will  invite.  --Milton. 
 
  2.  Pertaining  to  the  country,  as  distinguished  from  the 
  neighborhood  of  towns;  rustic;  rude;  unpolished.  [Obs.]  `` 
  The  race  of  upland  giants.''  --Chapman. 
 
  {Upland  moccasin}.  (Zo["o]l.)  See  {Moccasin}. 
 
  {Upland  sandpiper},  or  {Upland  plover}  (Zo["o]l.),  a  large 
  American  sandpiper  ({Bartramia  longicauda})  much  valued  as 
  a  game  bird.  Unlike  most  sandpipers,  it  frequents  fields 
  and  uplands.  Called  also  {Bartramian  sandpiper}, 
  {Bartram's  tattler},  {field  plover},  {grass  plover}, 
  {highland  plover},  {hillbird},  {humility},  {prairie 
  plover},  {prairie  pigeon},  {prairie  snipe},  {papabote}, 
  {quaily},  and  {uplander}. 
 
  {Upland  sumach}  (Bot.),  a  North  American  shrub  of  the  genus 
  Rhus  ({Rhus  glabra}),  used  in  tanning  and  dyeing. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Humility  \Hu*mil"i*ty\,  n.;  pl  {Humilities}.  [OE.  humilite,  OF 
  humilit['e],  humelit['e],  F.  humilit['e],  fr  L.  humiliatis 
  See  {Humble}.] 
  1.  The  state  or  quality  of  being  humble;  freedom  from  pride 
  and  arrogance;  lowliness  of  mind;  a  modest  estimate  of 
  one's  own  worth;  a  sense  of  one's  own  unworthiness  through 
  imperfection  and  sinfulness;  self-abasement;  humbleness. 
 
  Serving  the  Lord  with  all  humility  of  mind.  --Acts 
  xx  19. 
 
  2.  An  act  of  submission  or  courtesy. 
 
  With  these  humilities  they  satisfied  the  young  king. 
  --Sir  J. 
  Davies. 
 
  Syn:  Lowliness;  humbleness;  meekness;  modesty;  diffidence. 
 
  Usage:  {Humility},  {Modesty},  {Diffidence}.  Diffidence  is  a 
  distrust  of  our  powers,  combined  with  a  fear  lest  our 
  failure  should  be  censured,  since  a  dread  of  failure 
  unconnected  with  a  dread  of  censure  is  not  usually 
  called  diffidence.  It  may  be  carried  too  far  and  is 
  not  always  like  modesty  and  humility,  a  virtue. 
  Modesty,  without  supposing  self-distrust,  implies  an 
  unwillingness  to  put  ourselves  forward,  and  an  absence 
  of  all  over-confidence  in  our  own  powers.  Humility 
  consists  in  rating  our  claims  low  in  being  willing  to 
  waive  our  rights,  and  take  a  lower  place  than  might  be 
  our  due.  It  does  not  require  of  us  to  underrate 
  ourselves 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  humility 
  n  1:  a  disposition  to  be  humble;  a  lack  of  false  pride;  "not 
  everyone  regards  humility  as  a  virtue"  [syn:  {humbleness}] 
  [ant:  {pride}] 
  2:  a  humble  feeling;  "he  was  filled  with  humility  at  the  sight 
  of  the  Pope"  [syn:  {humbleness}]  [ant:  {pride}] 
 
  From  Easton's  1897  Bible  Dictionary  [easton]: 
 
  Humility 
  a  prominent  Christian  grace  (Rom.  12:3;  15:17,  18;  1  Cor.  3:5-7; 
  2  Cor.  3:5;  Phil.  4:11-13).  It  is  a  state  of  mind  well  pleasing 
  to  God  (1  Pet.  3:4);  it  preserves  the  soul  in  tranquillity  (Ps. 
  69:32,  33),  and  makes  us  patient  under  trials  (Job  1:22). 
 
  Christ  has  set  us  an  example  of  humility  (Phil.  2:6-8).  We 
  should  be  led  thereto  by  a  remembrance  of  our  sins  (Lam.  3:39), 
  and  by  the  thought  that  it  is  the  way  to  honour  (Prov.  16:18), 
  and  that  the  greatest  promises  are  made  to  the  humble  (Ps. 
  147:6;  Isa.  57:15;  66:2;  1  Pet.  5:5).  It  is  a  "great  paradox  in 
  Christianity  that  it  makes  humility  the  avenue  to  glory." 
 




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