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indenture

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indenture


  4  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Indenture  \In*den"ture\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Indentured};  p. 
  pr  &  vb  n.  {Indenturing}.] 
  1.  To  indent;  to  make  hollows,  notches,  or  wrinkles  in  to 
  furrow. 
 
  Though  age  may  creep  on  and  indenture  the  brow. 
  --Woty. 
 
  2.  To  bind  by  indentures  or  written  contract;  as  to 
  indenture  an  apprentice. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Indenture  \In*den"ture\,  v.  i. 
  To  run  or  wind  in  and  out  to  be  cut  or  notched;  to  indent. 
  --Heywood. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Indenture  \In*den"ture\  (?;  135),  n.  [OE.  endenture,  OF 
  endenture,  LL  indentura  a  deed  in  duplicate,  with  indented 
  edges.  See  the  Note  below.  See  {Indent}.] 
  1.  The  act  of  indenting,  or  state  of  being  indented. 
 
  2.  (Law)  A  mutual  agreement  in  writing  between  two  or  more 
  parties,  whereof  each  party  has  usually  a  counterpart  or 
  duplicate;  sometimes  in  the  pl.,  a  short  form  for 
  {indentures  of  apprenticeship},  the  contract  by  which  a 
  youth  is  bound  apprentice  to  a  master. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  indenture 
  n  1:  a  concave  shape  in  a  surface  or  edge  or  coastline  etc  [syn: 
  {indentation}] 
  2:  formal  agreement  between  the  issuer  of  bonds  and  the 
  bondholders  as  to  terms  of  the  debt 
  3:  a  contract  binding  one  party  into  the  service  of  another  for 
  a  specified  term 
  4:  the  space  left  between  the  margin  and  the  start  of  an 
  indented  line  [syn:  {indentation},  {indent}] 
  v  :  bind  by  or  as  if  by  indentures,  as  of  an  apprentice 




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