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infirm

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infirm


  3  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Infirm  \In*firm"\,  v.  t.  [L.  infirmare  :  cf  F.  infirmer.] 
  To  weaken;  to  enfeeble.  [Obs.]  --Sir  W.  Raleigh. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Infirm  \In*firm"\  ([i^]n*f[~e]rm"),  a.  [L.  infirmus:  cf  F. 
  infirme.  See  {In-}  not  and  {Firm},  a.] 
  1.  Not  firm  or  sound;  weak;  feeble;  as  an  infirm  body;  an 
  infirm  constitution. 
 
  A  poor,  infirm,  weak,  and  despised  old  man.  --Shak. 
 
  2.  Weak  of  mind  or  will  irresolute;  vacillating.  ``An  infirm 
  judgment.''  --Burke. 
 
  Infirm  of  purpose!  --Shak. 
 
  3.  Not  solid  or  stable;  insecure;  precarious. 
 
  He  who  fixes  on  false  principles  treads  or  infirm 
  ground.  --South. 
 
  Syn:  Debilitated;  sickly;  feeble;  decrepit;  weak;  enfeebled; 
  irresolute;  vacillating;  imbecile. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  infirm 
  adj  1:  confined  to  bed  (by  illness)  [syn:  {bedfast},  {bedridden},  {bedrid}, 
  {sick-abed}] 
  2:  lacking  physical  strength  or  vitality;  "a  feeble  old  woman"; 
  "her  body  looked  sapless"  [syn:  {decrepit},  {feeble},  {sapless}, 
  {weak},  {weakly}] 
  3:  lacking  firmness  of  will  or  character  or  purpose;  "infirm  of 
  purpose;  give  me  the  daggers"  -  Shakespeare 
  4:  weak  and  feeble;  "I'm  feeling  seedy  today"  [syn:  {debilitated}, 
  {enfeebled},  {seedy}] 




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