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initiate

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initiate


  5  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Initiate  \In*i"ti*ate\,  n. 
  One  who  is  or  is  to  be  initiated. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Initiate  \In*i"ti*ate\,  v.  i. 
  To  do  the  first  act  to  perform  the  first  rite;  to  take  the 
  initiative.  [R.]  --Pope. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Initiate  \In*i"ti*ate\,  a.  [L.  initiatus  p.  p.] 
  1.  Unpracticed;  untried;  new  [Obs.]  ``The  initiate  fear  that 
  wants  hard  use.''  --Shak. 
 
  2.  Begun;  commenced;  introduced  to  or  instructed  in  the 
  rudiments;  newly  admitted. 
 
  To  rise  in  science  as  in  bliss,  Initiate  in  the 
  secrets  of  the  skies.  --Young. 
 
  {Initiate  tenant  by  courtesy}  (Law),  said  of  a  husband  who 
  becomes  such  in  his  wife's  estate  of  inheritance  by  the 
  birth  of  a  child,  but  whose  estate  is  not  consummated  till 
  the  death  of  the  wife.  --Mozley  &  W. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Initiate  \In*i"ti*ate\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Initiated};  p.  pr 
  &  vb  n.  {Initiating}.]  [L.  initiatus  p.  p.  of  initiare  to 
  begin,  fr  initium  beginning.  See  {Initial}.] 
  1.  To  introduce  by  a  first  act  to  make  a  beginning  with  to 
  set  afoot;  to  originate;  to  commence;  to  begin  or  enter 
  upon 
 
  How  are  changes  of  this  sort  to  be  initiated?  --I. 
  Taylor. 
 
  2.  To  acquaint  with  the  beginnings;  to  instruct  in  the 
  rudiments  or  principles;  to  introduce. 
 
  Providence  would  only  initiate  mankind  into  the 
  useful  knowledge  of  her  treasures,  leaving  the  rest 
  to  employ  our  industry.  --Dr.  H.  More 
 
  To  initiate  his  pupil  into  any  part  of  learning,  an 
  ordinary  skill  in  the  governor  is  enough.  --Locke. 
 
  3.  To  introduce  into  a  society  or  organization;  to  confer 
  membership  on  especially,  to  admit  to  a  secret  order  with 
  mysterious  rites  or  ceremonies. 
 
  The  Athenians  believed  that  he  who  was  initiated  and 
  instructed  in  the  mysteries  would  obtain  celestial 
  honor  after  death.  --Bp. 
  Warburton 
 
  He  was  initiated  into  half  a  dozen  clubs  before  he 
  was  one  and  twenty.  --Spectator. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  initiate 
  adj  :  having  been  introduced  to  something  new  [syn:  {initiated}] 
  n  1:  someone  new  to  a  field  or  activity  [syn:  {novice},  {beginner}, 
  {tyro},  {tiro}] 
  2:  someone  who  has  been  admitted  to  membership  in  a  scholarly 
  field  [syn:  {learned  person},  {pundit},  {savant}] 
  3:  people  who  been  introduced  to  the  mysteries  of  some  field  or 
  activity;  "it  is  very  familiar  to  the  initiate"  [syn:  {enlightened}] 
  [ant:  {uninitiate}] 
  v  1:  bring  into  being  "He  initiated  a  new  program";  "Start  a 
  foundation"  [syn:  {originate},  {start}] 
  2:  take  the  lead  or  initiative  in  participate  in  the 
  development  of  "This  South  African  surgeon  pioneered 
  heart  transplants"  [syn:  {pioneer}] 
  3:  accept  young  people  into  society,  usually  with  some  rite; 
  "African  men  are  initiated  when  they  reach  puberty"  [syn: 
  {induct}] 
  4:  bring  up  a  topic  for  discussion  [syn:  {broach}] 
  5:  prepare  the  way  for  "Hitler's  attack  on  Poland  led  up  to 
  World  War  Two"  [syn:  {lead  up}] 




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