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instinct

more about instinct

instinct


  4  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Instinct  \In*stinct"\,  a.  [L.  instinctus  p.  p.  of  instinguere 
  to  instigate,  incite;  cf  instigare  to  instigate.  Cf 
  {Instigate},  {Distinguish}.] 
  Urged  or  stimulated  from  within;  naturally  moved  or  impelled; 
  imbued;  animated;  alive;  quick;  as  birds  instinct  with  life. 
 
  The  chariot  of  paternal  deity  .  .  .  Itself  instinct 
  with  spirit,  but  convoyed  By  four  cherubic  shapes. 
  --Milton. 
 
  A  noble  performance,  instinct  with  sound  principle. 
  --Brougham. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Instinct  \In"stinct\,  n.  [L.  instinctus  instigation,  impulse, 
  fr  instinguere  to  instigate:  cf  F.  instinct.  See 
  {Instinct},  a.] 
  1.  Natural  inward  impulse;  unconscious,  involuntary,  or 
  unreasoning  prompting  to  any  mode  of  action  whether 
  bodily,  or  mental,  without  a  distinct  apprehension  of  the 
  end  or  object  to  be  accomplished. 
 
  An  instinct  is  a  propensity  prior  to  experience,  and 
  independent  of  instructions.  --Paley. 
 
  An  instinct  is  a  blind  tendency  to  some  mode  of 
  action  independent  of  any  consideration,  on  the 
  part  of  the  agent,  of  the  end  to  which  the  action 
  leads.  --Whately. 
 
  An  instinct  is  an  agent  which  performs  blindly  and 
  ignorantly  a  work  of  intelligence  and  knowledge. 
  --Sir  W. 
  Hamilton. 
 
  By  a  divine  instinct,  men's  minds  mistrust  Ensuing 
  dangers.  --Shak. 
 
  2.  (Zo["o]l.)  Specif.,  the  natural,  unreasoning,  impulse  by 
  which  an  animal  is  guided  to  the  performance  of  any 
  action  without  of  improvement  in  the  method. 
 
  The  resemblance  between  what  originally  was  a  habit, 
  and  an  instinct  becomes  so  close  as  not  to  be 
  distinguished.  --Darwin. 
 
  3.  A  natural  aptitude  or  knack;  a  predilection;  as  an 
  instinct  for  order  to  be  modest  by  instinct. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Instinct  \In*stinct"\,  v.  t. 
  To  impress,  as  an  animating  power,  or  instinct.  [Obs.] 
  --Bentley. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  instinct 
  adj  :  (followed  by  `with')  deeply  filled  or  permeated;  "imbued 
  with  the  spirit  of  the  Reformation";  "words  instinct 
  with  love"  [syn:  {imbued(p)},  {instinct(p)}] 
  n  :  inborn  pattern  of  behavior  often  responsive  to  specific 
  stimuli:  "the  spawning  instinct  in  salmon";  "altruistic 
  instincts  in  social  animals"  [syn:  {inherent  aptitude}] 




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