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interlacing

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interlacing


  3  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Interlace  \In`ter*lace"\,  v.  t.  &  i.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Interlaced}; 
  p.  pr  &  vb  n.  {Interlacing}.]  [OE.  entrelacen  F. 
  entrelacer  See  {Inter-},  and  {Lace}.] 
  To  unite,  as  by  lacing  together;  to  insert  or  interpose  one 
  thing  within  another;  to  intertwine;  to  interweave. 
 
  Severed  into  stripes  That  interlaced  each  other 
  --Cowper. 
 
  The  epic  way  is  every  where  interlaced  with  dialogue. 
  --Dryden. 
 
  {Interlacing  arches}  (Arch.),  arches,  usually  circular,  so 
  constructed  that  their  archivolts  intersect  and  seem  to  be 
  interlaced. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  interlacing 
  adj  :  linked  or  locked  closely  together  as  by  dovetailing  [syn:  {interlinking}, 
  {interlocking},  {interwoven}] 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  interlacing 
 
  1.    A  {video}  display  system  which  builds  an  {image} 
  on  the  {VDU}  in  two  phases,  known  as  "fields",  consisting  of 
  even  and  odd  horizontal  lines. 
 
  The  complete  image  (a  "frame")  is  created  by  scanning  an 
  electron  beam  horizontally  across  the  screen,  starting  at  the 
  top  and  moving  down  after  each  horizontal  scan  until  the 
  bottom  of  the  screen  is  reached,  at  which  point  the  scan 
  starts  again  at  the  top  On  an  interlaced  display,  even 
  numbered  {scan  lines}  are  displayed  in  the  first  field  and 
  then  odd  numbered  lines  in  the  second  field. 
 
  For  a  given  screen  {resolution},  {refresh  rate}  (frames  per 
  second)  and  {phosphor}  {persistence},  interlacing  reduces 
  flicker  because  the  top  and  bottom  of  the  screen  are  redrawn 
  twice  as  often  as  if  the  scan  simply  proceded  from  top  to 
  bottom  in  a  single  vertical  sweep. 
 
  2.    {progressive  coding}. 
 
  (1998-02-25) 
 
 




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