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jump

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jump


  9  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Jupon  \Ju*pon"\,  Juppon  \Jup*pon"\,  n.  [F.  jupon,  fr  jupe 
  skirt,  Sp  aljuba  a  Moorish  garment,  Ar  jubba.]  [Written 
  variously  {jupe},  {jump},  {juppo},  etc.] 
  1.  A  sleeveless  jacket  worn  over  the  armor  in  the  14th 
  century.  It  fitted  closely,  and  descended  below  the  hips. 
  --Dryden. 
 
  2.  A  petticoat.  --Halliwell. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Jump  \Jump\,  v.  t. 
  1.  To  pass  by  a  spring  or  leap;  to  overleap;  as  to  jump  a 
  stream. 
 
  2.  To  cause  to  jump;  as  he  jumped  his  horse  across  the 
  ditch. 
 
  3.  To  expose  to  danger;  to  risk;  to  hazard.  [Obs.] 
 
  To  jump  a  body  with  a  dangerous  physic.  --  Shak. 
 
  4.  Smithwork 
  a  To  join  by  a  butt  weld. 
  b  To  thicken  or  enlarge  by  endwise  blows;  to  upset. 
 
  5.  (Quarrying)  To  bore  with  a  jumper. 
 
  {To  jump  a  claim},  to  enter  upon  and  take  possession  of  land 
  to  which  another  has  acquired  a  claim  by  prior  entry  and 
  occupation.  [Western  U.  S.  &  Australia]  See  {Claim},  n., 
  3. 
 
  {To  jump  one's  bail},  to  abscond  while  at  liberty  under  bail 
  bonds.  [Slang,  U.  S.] 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Jump  \Jump\,  n.  [Cf.  F.  jupe  a  long  petticoat,  a  skirt.  Cf 
  {Juppon}.] 
  a  A  kind  of  loose  jacket  for  men. 
  b  pl  A  bodice  worn  instead  of  stays  by  women  in  the  18th 
  century. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Jump  \Jump\,  v.  i.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Jumped};  p.  pr  &  vb  n. 
  {Jumping}.]  [Akin  to  OD  gumpen,  dial.  G.  gumpen,  jumpen.] 
  1.  To  spring  free  from  the  ground  by  the  muscular  action  of 
  the  feet  and  legs;  to  project  one's  self  through  the  air; 
  to  spring;  to  bound;  to  leap. 
 
  Not  the  worst  of  the  three  but  jumps  twelve  foot  and 
  a  half  by  the  square.  --  Shak. 
 
  2.  To  move  as  if  by  jumping;  to  bounce;  to  jolt.  ``The 
  jumping  chariots.''  --Nahum  iii.  2. 
 
  A  flock  of  geese  jump  down  together.  --  Dryden. 
 
  3.  To  coincide;  to  agree;  to  accord;  to  tally;  --  followed  by 
  with  ``It  jumps  with  my  humor.''  --Shak. 
 
  {To  jump  at},  to  spring  to  hence  fig.,  to  accept  suddenly 
  or  eagerly;  as  a  fish  jumps  at  a  bait;  to  jump  at  a 
  chance. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Jump  \Jump\,  n. 
  1.  The  act  of  jumping;  a  leap;  a  spring;  a  bound.  ``To 
  advance  by  jumps.''  --Locke. 
 
  2.  An  effort;  an  attempt;  a  venture.  [Obs.] 
 
  Our  fortune  lies  Upon  thisjump  --  Shak. 
 
  3.  The  space  traversed  by  a  leap. 
 
  4.  (Mining)  A  dislocation  in  a  stratum;  a  fault. 
 
  5.  (Arch.)  An  abrupt  interruption  of  level  in  a  piece  of 
  brickwork  or  masonry. 
 
  {From  the  jump},  from  the  start  or  beginning.  [Colloq.] 
 
  {Jump  joint}. 
  a  A  butt  joint. 
  b  A  flush  joint,  as  of  plank  in  carvel-built  vessels. 
 
  {Jump  seat}. 
  a  A  movable  carriage  seat. 
  b  A  carriage  constructed  with  a  seat  which  may  be 
  shifted  so  as  to  make  room  for  second  or  extra  seat. 
  Also  used  adjectively;  as  a  jump-seat  wagon. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Jump  \Jump\,  a. 
  Nice;  exact;  matched;  fitting;  precise.  [Obs.]  ``Jump 
  names.''  --B.  Jonson 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Jump  \Jump\,  adv 
  Exactly;  pat.[Obs.]  --Shak. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  jump 
  n  1:  a  sudden  and  decisive  increase;  "a  jump  in  attendance"  [syn: 
  {leap}] 
  2:  an  abrupt  transition;  "a  successful  leap  from  college  to  the 
  major  leagues"  [syn:  {leap}] 
  3:  in  films:  a  transition  from  one  scene  to  another 
  4:  a  sudden  involuntary  movement:  "he  awoke  with  a  start"  [syn: 
  {startle},  {start}] 
  5:  descent  with  a  parachute  [syn:  {parachuting}] 
  6:  the  act  of  jumping;  propelling  yourself  off  the  ground;  "he 
  advanced  in  a  series  of  jumps";  "the  jumping  was 
  unexpected"  [syn:  {jumping}] 
  v  1:  move  forward  by  leaps  and  bounds;  "The  horse  bounded  across 
  the  meadow";  "The  child  leapt  across  the  puddle";  "Can 
  you  jump  over  the  fence?"  [syn:  {leap},  {bound},  {spring}] 
  2:  move  or  jump  suddenly,  as  if  in  surprise  or  alarm;  "She 
  startled  when  I  walked  into  the  room"  [syn:  {startle},  {start}] 
  3:  make  a  sudden  physical  attack  on  "The  muggers  jumped  the 
  woman  in  the  fur  coat" 
  4:  increase  suddenly  and  significantly;  "Prices  jumped 
  overnight" 
  5:  be  highly  noticeable  [syn:  {leap  out},  {jump  out},  {stand 
  out}] 
  6:  enter  eagerly  into  "He  jumped  into  the  game" 
  7:  rise  in  rank  or  status;  "Her  new  novel  jumped  high  on  the 
  bestseller  list"  [syn:  {rise},  {climb  up}] 
  8:  of  trains  [syn:  {derail},  {run  off  the  rails}] 
  9:  cause  to  jump  or  leap,  as  of  a  trained  animal  [syn:  {leap}] 
  10:  of  car  engines  [syn:  {jumpstart}] 
  11:  bypass;  "He  skippped  a  row  in  the  text  and  so  the  sentence 
  was  incomprehensible"  [syn:  {pass  over},  {skip},  {skip 
  over}] 
  12:  pass  abruptly  from  one  state  or  topic  to  another;  "leap 
  into  fame";  "jump  to  a  conclusion"  [syn:  {leap}] 
  13:  go  back  and  forth;  swing  back  and  forth  between  two  states 
  or  conditions  [syn:  {alternate}] 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  jump 
 
    (Or  "branch")  The  term  for  a  {goto}  instruction, 
  usually  in  a  context  of  {machine  languages}.  Branch"  may  be 
  synonymous  with  "jump",  or  may  refer  to  jumps  that  depend  on  a 
  condition. 
 
  (1998-11-14) 
 
 




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