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lintmore about lint

lint


  4  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Lint  \Lint\  (l[i^]nt),  n.  [AS.  l[=i]net  flax,  hemp,  fr  l[=i]n 
  flax;  or  perh.  borrowed  fr  L.  linteum  a  linen  cloth,  linen, 
  from  linteus  linen,  a.,  fr  linum  flax,  lint.  See  {Linen}.] 
  1.  Flax. 
 
  2.  Linen  scraped  or  otherwise  made  into  a  soft,  downy  or 
  fleecy  substance  for  dressing  wounds  and  sores;  also  fine 
  ravelings,  down  fluff,  or  loose  short  fibers  from  yarn  or 
  fabrics. 
 
  {Lint  doctor}  (Calico-printing  Mach.),  a  scraper  to  remove 
  lint  from  a  printing  cylinder. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  lint 
  n  1:  fine  ravellings  of  cotton  or  linen  fibers 
  2:  cotton  or  linen  fabric  with  the  nap  raised  on  one  side  used 
  to  dress  wounds 
 
  From  Jargon  File  (4.2.3,  23  NOV  2000)  [jargon]: 
 
  lint  [from  Unix's  `lint(1)',  named  for  the  bits  of  fluff  it 
  supposedly  picks  from  programs]  1.  vt  To  examine  a  program  closely  for 
  style,  language  usage,  and  portability  problems,  esp.  if  in  C,  esp.  if 
  via  use  of  automated  analysis  tools,  most  esp.  if  the  Unix  utility 
  `lint(1)'  is  used  This  term  used  to  be  restricted  to  use  of  `lint(1)' 
  itself  but  (judging  by  references  on  Usenet)  it  has  become  a  shorthand 
  for  {desk  check}  at  some  non-Unix  shops,  even  in  languages  other  than  C. 
  Also  as  v.  {delint}.  2.  n.  Excess  verbiage  in  a  document,  as  in  "This 
  draft  has  too  much  lint". 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  lint 
 
  A  {Unix}  {C}  language  processor  which  carries  out  more 
  thorough  checks  on  the  code  than  is  usual  with  C  {compiler}s. 
 
  Lint  is  named  after  the  bits  of  fluff  it  supposedly  picks  from 
  programs.  Judging  by  references  on  {Usenet}  this  term  has 
  become  a  shorthand  for  {desk  check}  at  some  non-Unix  shops, 
  even  in  languages  other  than  {C}.  Also  used  as  {delint}. 
 
  [{Jargon  File}] 
 
  (1994-11-14) 
 
 




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