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objectmore about object

object


  6  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Object  \Ob*ject"\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Objected};  p.  pr  &  vb 
  n.  {Objecting}.]  [L.  objectus  p.  p.  of  objicere  obicere  to 
  throw  or  put  before  to  oppose;  ob  (see  {Ob-})  +  jacere  to 
  throw:  cf  objecter.  See  {Jet}  a  shooting  forth.] 
  1.  To  set  before  or  against;  to  bring  into  opposition;  to 
  oppose.  [Obs.] 
 
  Of  less  account  some  knight  thereto  object,  Whose 
  loss  so  great  and  harmful  can  not  prove.  --Fairfax. 
 
  Some  strong  impediment  or  other  objecting  itself 
  --Hooker. 
 
  Pallas  to  their  eyes  The  mist  objected,  and 
  condensed  the  skies.  --Pope. 
 
  2.  To  offer  in  opposition  as  a  criminal  charge  or  by  way  of 
  accusation  or  reproach;  to  adduce  as  an  objection  or 
  adverse  reason. 
 
  He  gave  to  him  to  object  his  heinous  crime. 
  --Spencer. 
 
  Others  object  the  poverty  of  the  nation.  --Addison. 
 
  The  book  .  .  .  giveth  liberty  to  object  any  crime 
  against  such  as  are  to  be  ordered  --Whitgift. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Object  \Ob*ject"\,  v.  i. 
  To  make  opposition  in  words  or  argument;  --  usually  followed 
  by  to  --Sir.  T.  More 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Object  \Ob"ject\,  n.  [L.  objectus  See  {Object},  v.  t.] 
  1.  That  which  is  put  or  which  may  be  regarded  as  put  in  the 
  way  of  some  of  the  senses  something  visible  or  tangible; 
  as  he  observed  an  object  in  the  distance;  all  the  objects 
  in  sight;  he  touched  a  strange  object  in  the  dark. 
 
  2.  That  which  is  set  or  which  may  be  regarded  as  set  before 
  the  mind  so  as  to  be  apprehended  or  known  that  of  which 
  the  mind  by  any  of  its  activities  takes  cognizance, 
  whether  a  thing  external  in  space  or  a  conception  formed 
  by  the  mind  itself  as  an  object  of  knowledge,  wonder, 
  fear,  thought,  study,  etc 
 
  Object  is  a  term  for  that  about  which  the  knowing 
  subject  is  conversant;  what  the  schoolmen  have 
  styled  the  ``materia  circa  quam.''  --Sir.  W. 
  Hamilton. 
 
  The  object  of  their  bitterest  hatred.  --Macaulay. 
 
  3.  That  by  which  the  mind,  or  any  of  its  activities,  is 
  directed;  that  on  which  the  purpose  are  fixed  as  the  end 
  of  action  or  effort;  that  which  is  sought  for  end  aim 
  motive;  final  cause 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Object  \Ob*ject"\,  a.  [L.  objectus  p.  p.] 
  Opposed;  presented  in  opposition;  also  exposed.  [Obs.] 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  object 
  n  1:  a  physical  (tangible  and  visible)  entity;  "it  was  full  of 
  rackets,  balls  and  other  objects"  [syn:  {physical  object}] 
  2:  the  goal  intended  to  be  attained  (and  which  is  believed  to 
  be  attainable);  "the  sole  object  of  her  trip  was  to  see 
  her  children"  [syn:  {aim},  {objective},  {target}] 
  3:  a  grammatical  constituent  that  is  acted  upon  "the  object  of 
  the  verb" 
  4:  the  focus  of  cognitions  or  feelings;  "objects  of  thought"; 
  "the  object  of  my  affection" 
  v  :  express  or  raise  an  objection  or  protest;  express  dissent; 
  "She  never  objected  to  the  amount  of  work  her  boss 
  charged  her  with" 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  object 
 
  In  {object-oriented  programming},  a  unique  instance  of  a  data 
  structure  defined  according  to  the  template  provided  by  its 
  {class}.  Each  object  has  its  own  values  for  the  variables 
  belonging  to  its  class  and  can  respond  to  the  messages 
  ({method}s)  defined  by  its  class. 
 
 




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