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partymore about party

party


  6  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Party  \Par"ty\,  n.;  pl  {Parties}.  [F.  parti  and  partie,  fr  F. 
  partir  to  part  divide,  L.  partire  partiri  See  {Part},  v.] 
  1.  A  part  or  portion.  [Obs.]  ``The  most  party  of  the  time.'' 
  --Chaucer. 
 
  2.  A  number  of  persons  united  in  opinion  or  action  as 
  distinguished  from  or  opposed  to  the  rest  of  a  community 
  or  association;  esp.,  one  of  the  parts  into  which  a  people 
  is  divided  on  questions  of  public  policy. 
 
  Win  the  noble  Brutus  to  our  party.  --Shak. 
 
  The  peace  both  parties  want  is  like  to  last 
  --Dryden. 
 
  3.  A  part  of  a  larger  body  of  company;  a  detachment; 
  especially  (Mil.),  a  small  body  of  troops  dispatched  on 
  special  service. 
 
  4.  A  number  of  persons  invited  to  a  social  entertainment;  a 
  select  company;  as  a  dinner  party;  also  the 
  entertainment  itself  as  to  give  a  party. 
 
  5.  One  concerned  or  interested  in  an  affair;  one  who  takes 
  part  with  others  a  participator;  as  he  was  a  party  to 
  the  plot;  a  party  to  the  contract. 
 
  6.  The  plaintiff  or  the  defendant  in  a  lawsuit,  whether  an 
  individual,  a  firm,  or  corporation;  a  litigant. 
 
  The  cause  of  both  parties  shall  come  before  the 
  judges.  --Ex.  xxii.  9. 
 
  7.  Hence  any  certain  person  who  is  regarded  as  being  opposed 
  or  antagonistic  to  another. 
 
  It  the  jury  found  that  the  party  slain  was  of 
  English  race,  it  had  been  adjudged  felony.  --Sir  J. 
  Davies. 
 
  8.  Cause  side  interest. 
 
  Have  you  nothing  said  Upon  this  Party  'gainst  the 
  Duke  of  Albany?  --Shak. 
 
  9.  A  person;  as  he  is  a  queer  party.  [Now  accounted  a 
  vulgarism.] 
 
  Note:  ``For  several  generations,  our  ancestors  largely 
  employed  party  for  person;  but  this  use  of  the  word 
  when  it  appeared  to  be  reviving,  happened  to  strike, 
  more  particularly,  the  fancy  of  the  vulgar;  and  the 
  consequence  has  been  that  the  polite  have  chosen  to 
  leave  it  in  their  undisputed  possession.''  --Fitzed. 
  Hall. 
 
  {Party  jury}  (Law),  a  jury  composed  of  different  parties,  as 
  one  which  is  half  natives  and  half  foreigners. 
 
  {Party  man},  a  partisan.  --Swift. 
 
  {Party  spirit},  a  factious  and  unreasonable  temper,  not 
  uncommonly  shown  by  party  men.  --Whately. 
 
  {Party  verdict},  a  joint  verdict.  --Shak. 
 
  {Party  wall}. 
  a  (Arch.)  A  wall  built  upon  the  dividing  line  between 
  two  adjoining  properties,  usually  having  half  its 
  thickness  on  each  property. 
  b  (Law)  A  wall  that  separates  adjoining  houses,  as  in  a 
  block  or  row. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Party  \Par"ty\,  a.  [F.  parti  divided,  fr  partir  to  divide.  See 
  {Part},  v.,  and  cf  {Partite}.] 
  1.  (Her.)  Parted  or  divided,  as  in  the  direction  or  form  of 
  one  of  the  ordinaries;  as  an  escutcheon  party  per  pale. 
 
  2.  Partial;  favoring  one  party. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Party  \Par"ty\,  adv 
  Partly.  [Obs.]  --Chaucer. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  party 
  adj  :  based  upon  or  representing  political  parties;  "party 
  politics";  "party  leaders"  [syn:  {party(a)}] 
  n  1:  an  organization  to  gain  political  power;  "in  1992  Perot 
  tried  to  organize  a  third  party  at  the  national  level" 
  [syn:  {political  party}] 
  2:  an  occasion  on  which  people  can  assemble  for  social 
  interaction  and  entertainment;  "he  planned  a  party  to 
  celebrate  Bastille  Day" 
  3:  a  band  of  people  associated  temporarily  in  some  activity; 
  "they  organized  a  party  to  search  for  food";  "the  company 
  of  cooks  walked  into  the  kitchen"  [syn:  {company}] 
  4:  a  group  of  people  gathered  together  for  pleasure;  "she 
  joined  the  party  after  dinner" 
  5:  a  person  involved  in  legal  proceedings;  "the  party  of  the 
  first  part" 
  v  :  have  a  party;  "The  students  were  partying  all  night  before 
  the  exam" 
 
  From  Jargon  File  (4.2.3,  23  NOV  2000)  [jargon]: 
 
  @-party  /at'par`tee/  n.  [from  the  @-sign  in  an  Internet 
  address]  (alt.  `@-sign  party'  /at'si:n  par`tee/)  A  semi-closed  party 
  thrown  for  hackers  at  a  science-fiction  convention  (esp.  the  annual  World 
  Science  Fiction  Convention  or  "Worldcon");  one  must  have  a  {network 
  address}  to  get  in  or  at  least  be  in  company  with  someone  who  does 
  One  of  the  most  reliable  opportunities  for  hackers  to  meet  face  to  face 
  with  people  who  might  otherwise  be  represented  by  mere  phosphor  dots  on 
  their  screens.  Compare  {boink}. 
 
  The  first  recorded  @-party  was  held  at  the  Westercon  (a  U.S. 
  western  regional  SF  convention)  over  the  July  4th  weekend  in  1980. 
  It  is  not  clear  exactly  when  the  canonical  @-party  venue  shifted  to  the 
  Worldcon  but  it  had  certainly  become  established  by  Constellation  in  1983. 
  Sadly,  the  @-party  tradition  has  been  in  decline  since  about  1996,  mainly 
  because  having  an  @-address  no  longer  functions  as  an  effective  lodge  pin. 
 
  =  A  =  ===== 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  @-party 
 
    /at'par-tee/  (Or  "@-sign  party"  /at'si:n  par'tee/, 
  from  the  {@}  sign  in  an  {electronic  mail  address})  A 
  semi-closed  party  thrown  for  hackers  at  a  science-fiction 
  convention  (especially  the  annual  Worldcon);  one  must  have  an 
  {electronic  mail  address}  to  get  in  or  at  least  be  in  company 
  with  someone  who  does  One  of  the  most  reliable  opportunities 
  for  hackers  to  meet  {face-to-face}  with  people  who  might 
  otherwise  be  represented  by  mere  phosphor  dots  on  their 
  screens. 
 
  Compare  {boink}. 
 
  [{Jargon  File}] 
 
  (1996-05-08) 
 
 




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