browse words by letter
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

proofmore about proof

proof


  6  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Proof  \Proof\,  a. 
  1.  Used  in  proving  or  testing;  as  a  proof  load,  or  proof 
  charge. 
 
  2.  Firm  or  successful  in  resisting;  as  proof  against  harm; 
  waterproof;  bombproof. 
 
  I  .  .  .  have  found  thee  Proof  against  all 
  temptation.  --Milton. 
 
  This  was  a  good,  stout  proof  article  of  faith. 
  --Burke. 
 
  3.  Being  of  a  certain  standard  as  to  strength;  --  said  of 
  alcoholic  liquors. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Proof  \Proof\,  n.  [OF.  prove,  proeve,  F.  preuve,  fr  L.  proba, 
  fr  probare  to  prove.  See  {Prove}.] 
  1.  Any  effort,  process,  or  operation  designed  to  establish  or 
  discover  a  fact  or  truth;  an  act  of  testing;  a  test;  a 
  trial. 
 
  For  whatsoever  mother  wit  or  art  Could  work  he  put 
  in  proof.  --Spenser. 
 
  You  shall  have  many  proofs  to  show  your  skill. 
  --Ford. 
 
  Formerly,  a  very  rude  mode  of  ascertaining  the 
  strength  of  spirits  was  practiced,  called  the  proof. 
  --Ure. 
 
  2.  That  degree  of  evidence  which  convinces  the  mind  of  any 
  truth  or  fact  and  produces  belief;  a  test  by  facts  or 
  arguments  that  induce,  or  tend  to  induce,  certainty  of  the 
  judgment;  conclusive  evidence;  demonstration. 
 
  I'll  have  some  proof.  --Shak. 
 
  It  is  no  proof  of  a  man's  understanding  to  be  able 
  to  confirm  whatever  he  pleases.  --Emerson. 
 
  Note:  Properly  speaking,  proof  is  the  effect  or  result  of 
  evidence,  evidence  is  the  medium  of  proof.  Cf 
  {Demonstration},  1. 
 
  3.  The  quality  or  state  of  having  been  proved  or  tried 
  firmness  or  hardness  that  resists  impression,  or  does  not 
  yield  to  force;  impenetrability  of  physical  bodies. 
 
  4.  Firmness  of  mind;  stability  not  to  be  shaken. 
 
  5.  (Print.)  A  trial  impression,  as  from  type  taken  for 
  correction  or  examination;  --  called  also  {proof  sheet}. 
 
  6.  (Math.)  A  process  for  testing  the  accuracy  of  an  operation 
  performed.  Cf  {Prove},  v.  t.,  5. 
 
  7.  Armor  of  excellent  or  tried  quality,  and  deemed 
  impenetrable;  properly,  armor  of  proof.  [Obs.]  --Shak. 
 
  {Artist's  proof},  a  very  early  proof  impression  of  an 
  engraving,  or  the  like  --  often  distinguished  by  the 
  artist's  signature. 
 
  {Proof  reader},  one  who  reads,  and  marks  correction  in 
  proofs.  See  def.  5,  above. 
 
  Syn:  Testimony;  evidence;  reason;  argument;  trial; 
  demonstration.  See  {Testimony}. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  proof 
  adj  :  (used  in  combination  or  as  a  suffix)  able  to  withstand; 
  "temptation-proof";  "childproof  locks"  [syn:  {proof(p)}] 
  n  1:  any  factual  evidence  that  helps  to  establish  the  truth  of 
  something  "if  you  have  any  proof  for  what  you  say  now 
  is  the  time  to  produce  it"  [syn:  {cogent  evidence}] 
  2:  (logic  or  mathematics)  a  formal  series  of  statements  showing 
  that  if  one  thing  is  true  something  else  necessarily 
  follows  from  it 
  3:  a  measure  of  alcoholic  strength  expressed  as  an  integer 
  twice  the  percentage  of  alcohol  present  (by  volume) 
  4:  (printing)  a  trial  impression  made  to  check  for  errors  [syn: 
  {test  copy}] 
  5:  a  trial  print  from  a  negative 
  6:  the  act  of  finding  or  testing  the  truth  of  something  [syn:  {validation}, 
  {validating},  {proving}] 
  v  1:  make  or  take  a  proof  of  such  as  a  photographic  negative,  an 
  etching,  or  typeset 
  2:  read  for  errors  [syn:  {proofread}] 
  3:  activate  by  mixing  with  water  and  sometimes  sugar  or  milk; 
  "proof  yeast" 
  4:  make  resistant,  as  to  water,  sound,  errors,  etc 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  proof 
 
  1.    A  {finite}  sequence  of  {well-formed  formula}s,  F1, 
  F2,  ...  Fn  where  each  Fi  either  is  an  {axiom},  or  follows  by 
  some  rule  of  inference  from  some  of  the  previous  F's,  and  Fn 
  is  the  statement  being  proved. 
 
  See  also  {proof  theory}. 
 
  2.  A  left-associative  {natural  language}  {parser}  by  Craig 
  R.  Latta  .  Ported  to  {Decstation 
  3100},  {Sun-4}. 
 
  {(ftp://scam.berkeley.edu/pub/src/local/proof/)} 
 
  E-mail:  .  Mailing  list: 
  proof-requestf@xcf.berkeley.edu  (Subject:  add  me). 
 
  (1994-11-29) 
 
 
 
  From  THE  DEVIL'S  DICTIONARY  ((C)1911  Released  April  15  1993)  [devils]: 
 
  PROOF,  n.  Evidence  having  a  shade  more  of  plausibility  than  of 
  unlikelihood.  The  testimony  of  two  credible  witnesses  as  opposed  to 
  that  of  only  one 
 
 
 
  From  THE  DEVIL'S  DICTIONARY  ((C)1911  Released  April  15  1993)  [devils]: 
 
  PROOF-:READER:,  n.  A  malefactor  who  atones  for  making  your  writing 
  nonsense  by  permitting  the  compositor  to  make  it  unintelligible. 
 
 




more about proof