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roarmore about roar

roar


  4  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Roar  \Roar\,  v.  i.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Roared};  p.  pr  &  vvb.  n. 
  {Roaring}.]  [OE.  roren,  raren,  AS  r[=a]rian;  akin  to  G. 
  r["o]hten,  OHG.  r?r?n.  [root]112.] 
  1.  To  cry  with  a  full,  loud,  continued  sound.  Specifically: 
  a  To  bellow,  or  utter  a  deep,  loud  cry,  as  a  lion  or 
  other  beast. 
 
  Roaring  bulls  he  would  him  make  to  tame. 
  --Spenser. 
  b  To  cry  loudly,  as  in  pain,  distress,  or  anger. 
 
  Sole  on  the  barren  sands,  the  suffering  chief 
  Roared  out  for  anguish,  and  indulged  his  grief. 
  --Dryden. 
 
  He  scorned  to  roar  under  the  impressions  of  a 
  finite  anger.  --South. 
 
  2.  To  make  a  loud,  confused  sound,  as  winds,  waves,  passing 
  vehicles,  a  crowd  of  persons  when  shouting  together,  or 
  the  like 
 
  The  brazen  throat  of  war  had  ceased  to  roar. 
  --Milton. 
 
  How  oft  I  crossed  where  carts  and  coaches  roar. 
  --Gay. 
 
  3.  To  be  boisterous;  to  be  disorderly. 
 
  It  was  a  mad,  roaring  time,  full  of  extravagance. 
  --Bp.  Burnet. 
 
  4.  To  laugh  out  loudly  and  continuously;  as  the  hearers 
  roared  at  his  jokes. 
 
  5.  To  make  a  loud  noise  in  breathing,  as  horses  having  a 
  certain  disease.  See  {Roaring},  2. 
 
  {Roaring  boy},  a  roaring,  noisy  fellow;  --  name  given  at  the 
  latter  end  Queen  Elizabeth's  reign,  to  the  riotous  fellows 
  who  raised  disturbances  in  the  street.  ``Two  roaring  boys 
  of  Rome,  that  made  all  split.''  --Beau.  &  Fl 
 
  {Roaring  forties}  (Naut.),  a  sailor's  name  for  the  stormy 
  tract  of  ocean  between  40[deg]  and  50[deg]  north  latitude. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Roar  \Roar\,  v.  t. 
  To  cry  aloud;  to  proclaim  loudly. 
 
  This  last  action  will  roar  thy  infamy.  --Ford. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Roar  \Roar\,  n. 
  The  sound  of  roaring.  Specifically: 
  a  The  deep,  loud  cry  of  a  wild  beast;  as  the  roar  of  a 
  lion. 
  b  The  cry  of  one  in  pain,  distress,  anger,  or  the  like 
  c  A  loud,  continuous,  and  confused  sound;  as  the  roar  of  a 
  cannon,  of  the  wind,  or  the  waves;  the  roar  of  ocean. 
 
  Arm!  arm!  it  is  it  is  the  cannon's  opening  roar! 
  --Byron. 
  d  A  boisterous  outcry  or  shouting,  as  in  mirth. 
 
  Pit,  boxes,  and  galleries  were  in  a  constant  roar 
  of  laughter.  --Macaulay. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  roar 
  n  1:  a  deep  prolonged  loud  noise  [syn:  {boom},  {roaring},  {thunder}] 
  2:  a  very  loud  utterance;  "his  bellow  filled  the  hallway"  [syn: 
  {bellow},  {bellowing},  {holla},  {holler},  {hollering},  {hollo}, 
  {holloa},  {roaring},  {yowl},  {yowling}] 
  3:  the  sound  made  by  a  lion 
  v  1:  make  a  loud  noise,  as  of  wind,  water,  or  vehicles;  "The  wind 
  was  howling  in  the  trees";  "The  water  roared  down  the 
  chute"  [syn:  {howl}] 
  2:  utter  words  loudly  and  forcefully;  "`Get  out  of  here,'  he 
  roared."  [syn:  {thunder}] 
  3:  emit  long  loud  cries;  "wail  in  self-pity",  "howl  with 
  sorrow"  [syn:  {howl},  {ululate},  {wail},  {yawl}] 
  4:  act  or  proceed  in  a  riotous,  turbulent,  or  disorderly  way: 
  "desperadoes  from  the  hills  regularly  roared  in  to  take 
  over  the  town"-R.A.Billington 
  5:  make  a  loud  noise,  as  of  animal;  "The  bull  bellowed"  [syn:  {bellow}] 
  6:  laugh  unrestrainedly  and  heartily  [syn:  {howl}] 




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