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rousemore about rouse

rouse


  6  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Rouse  \Rouse\  (rouz  or  rous),  v.  i.  &  t.  [Perhaps  the  same  word 
  as  rouse  to  start  up  ``buckle  to.'']  (Naut.) 
  To  pull  or  haul  strongly  and  all  together,  as  upon  a  rope, 
  without  the  assistance  of  mechanical  appliances. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Rouse  \Rouse\  (rouz),  n.  [Cf.  D.  roes  drunkeness,  icel.  r?ss, 
  Sw  rus,  G.  rauchen  and  also  E.  rouse,  v.t.,  rush,  v.i.  Cf 
  {Row}  a  disturbance.] 
  1.  A  bumper  in  honor  of  a  toast  or  health.  [Obs.]  --Shak. 
 
  2.  A  carousal;  a  festival;  a  drinking  frolic. 
 
  Fill  the  cup,  and  fill  the  can,  Have  a  rouse  before 
  the  morn.  --Tennyson. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Rouse  \Rouse\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Roused}  (rouzd);  p.  pr  & 
  vb  n.  {Rousing}.]  [Probably  of  Scan.  origin;  cf  Sw  rusa  to 
  rush,  Dan.  ruse,  AS  hre['o]san  to  fall,  rush.  Cf  {Rush}, 
  v.] 
  1.  To  cause  to  start  from  a  covert  or  lurking  place  as  to 
  rouse  a  deer  or  other  animal  of  the  chase. 
 
  Like  wild  boars  late  roused  out  of  the  brakes. 
  --Spenser. 
 
  Rouse  the  fleet  hart,  and  cheer  the  opening  hound. 
  --Pope. 
 
  2.  To  wake  from  sleep  or  repose;  as  to  rouse  one  early  or 
  suddenly. 
 
  3.  To  excite  to  lively  thought  or  action  from  a  state  of 
  idleness,  languor,  stupidity,  or  indifference;  as  to 
  rouse  the  faculties,  passions,  or  emotions. 
 
  To  rouse  up  a  people,  the  most  phlegmatic  of  any  in 
  Christendom.  --Atterbury. 
 
  4.  To  put  in  motion;  to  stir  up  to  agitate. 
 
  Blustering  winds,  which  all  night  long  Had  roused 
  the  sea.  --Milton. 
 
  5.  To  raise;  to  make  erect.  [Obs.]  --Spenser.  Shak. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Rouse  \Rouse\,  v.  i. 
  1.  To  get  or  start  up  to  rise.  [Obs.] 
 
  Night's  black  agents  to  their  preys  do  rouse. 
  --Shak. 
 
  2.  To  awake  from  sleep  or  repose. 
 
  Morpheus  rouses  from  his  bed.  --Pope. 
 
  3.  To  be  exited  to  thought  or  action  from  a  state  of 
  indolence  or  inattention. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  rouse 
  v  1:  become  active:  "He  finally  bestirred  himself"  [syn:  {bestir}] 
  2:  force  or  drive  out  "The  police  routed  them  out  of  bed  at  2 
  A.M."  [syn:  {rout  out},  {drive  out},  {force  out}] 
  3:  cause  to  be  agitated,  excited,  or  roused;  "The  speaker 
  charged  up  the  crowd  with  his  inflammatory  remarks"  [syn: 
  {agitate},  {charge},  {commove},  {excite},  {charge  up}] 
  [ant:  {calm}] 
  4:  cause  to  become  awake  or  conscious;  "He  was  roused  by  the 
  drunken  men  in  the  street";  "Please  wake  me  at  6  AM." 
  [syn:  {awaken},  {waken},  {wake  up},  {arouse}]  [ant:  {cause 
  to  sleep}] 
 
  From  U.S.  Gazetteer  (1990)  [gazetteer]: 
 
  Rouse,  KY 
  Zip  code(s):  41014 




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