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silkmore about silk

silk


  4  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Silk  \Silk\,  n.  [OE.  silk,  selk,  AS  seolc  seoloc  akin  to 
  Icel.  silki,  SW  &  Dan.  silke;  prob.  through  Slavic  from  an 
  Oriental  source;  cf  Lith.  szilkai  Russ.  shelk',  and  also  L. 
  sericum  Seric  stuff,  silk.  Cf  {Sericeous}.  {Serge}  a  woolen 
  stuff.] 
  1.  The  fine,  soft  thread  produced  by  various  species  of 
  caterpillars  in  forming  the  cocoons  within  which  the  worm 
  is  inclosed  during  the  pupa  state,  especially  that 
  produced  by  the  larv[ae]  of  {Bombyx  mori}. 
 
  2.  Hence  thread  spun,  or  cloth  woven,  from  the  above-named 
  material. 
 
  3.  That  which  resembles  silk,  as  the  filiform  styles  of  the 
  female  flower  of  maize. 
 
  {Raw  silk},  silk  as  it  is  wound  off  from  the  cocoons,  and 
  before  it  is  manufactured. 
 
  {Silk  cotton},  a  cottony  substance  enveloping  the  seeds  of 
  the  silk-cotton  tree. 
 
  {Silk-cotton  tree}  (Bot.),  a  name  for  several  tropical  trees 
  of  the  genera  {Bombax}  and  {Eriodendron},  and  belonging  to 
  the  order  {Bombace[ae]}.  The  trees  grow  to  an  immense 
  size,  and  have  their  seeds  enveloped  in  a  cottony 
  substance,  which  is  used  for  stuffing  cushions,  but  can 
  not  be  spun. 
 
  {Silk  flower}.  (Bot.) 
  a  The  silk  tree. 
  b  A  similar  tree  ({Calliandra  trinervia})  of  Peru. 
 
  {Silk  fowl}  (Zo["o]l.),  a  breed  of  domestic  fowls  having 
  silky  plumage. 
 
  {Silk  gland}  (Zo["o]l.),  a  gland  which  secretes  the  material 
  of  silk,  as  in  spider  or  a  silkworm;  a  sericterium. 
 
  {Silk  gown},  the  distinctive  robe  of  a  barrister  who  has  been 
  appointed  king's  or  queen's  counsel;  hence  the  counsel 
  himself.  Such  a  one  has  precedence  over  mere  barristers, 
  who  wear  stuff  gowns.  [Eng.] 
 
  {Silk  grass}  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  grass  ({Stipa  comata})  of  the 
  Western  United  States,  which  has  very  long  silky  awns.  The 
  name  is  also  sometimes  given  to  various  species  of  the 
  genera  {Aqave}  and  {Yucca}. 
 
  {Silk  moth}  (Zo["o]l.),  the  adult  moth  of  any  silkworm.  See 
  {Silkworm}. 
 
  {Silk  shag},  a  coarse,  rough-woven  silk,  like  plush,  but  with 
  a  stiffer  nap. 
 
  {Silk  spider}  (Zo["o]l.),  a  large  spider  ({Nephila 
  plumipes}),  native  of  the  Southern  United  States, 
  remarkable  for  the  large  quantity  of  strong  silk  it 
  produces  and  for  the  great  disparity  in  the  sizes  of  the 
  sexes. 
 
  {Silk  thrower},  {Silk  throwster},  one  who  twists  or  spins 
  silk,  and  prepares  it  for  weaving.  --Brande  &  C. 
 
  {Silk  tree}  (Bot.),  an  Asiatic  leguminous  tree  ({Albizzia 
  Julibrissin})  with  finely  bipinnate  leaves,  and  large  flat 
  pods;  --  so  called  because  of  the  abundant  long  silky 
  stamens  of  its  blossoms.  Also  called  {silk  flower}. 
 
  {Silk  vessel}.  (Zo["o]l.)  Same  as  {Silk  gland},  above. 
 
  {Virginia  silk}  (Bot.),  a  climbing  plant  ({Periploca 
  Gr[ae]ca})  of  the  Milkweed  family,  having  a  silky  tuft  on 
  the  seeds.  It  is  native  in  Southern  Europe. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Floss  \Floss\  (?;  195),  n.  [It.  floscio  flabby,  soft,  fr  L. 
  fluxus  flowing,  loose,  slack.  See  {Flux},  n.] 
  1.  (Bot.)  The  slender  styles  of  the  pistillate  flowers  of 
  maize;  also  called  {silk}. 
 
  2.  Untwisted  filaments  of  silk,  used  in  embroidering. 
 
  {Floss  silk},  silk  that  has  been  twisted,  and  which  retains 
  its  loose  and  downy  character.  It  is  much  used  in 
  embroidery.  Called  also  {floxed  silk}. 
 
  {Floss  thread},  a  kind  of  soft  flaxen  yarn  or  thread,  used 
  for  embroidery;  --  called  also  {linen  floss},  and  {floss 
  yarn}.  --McElrath. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  silk 
  n  1:  a  fabric  made  from  the  fine  threads  produced  by  certain 
  insect  larvae 
  2:  fibers  from  silkworm  cocoons  provide  threads  for  knitting 
 
  From  Easton's  1897  Bible  Dictionary  [easton]: 
 
  Silk 
  Heb.  demeshek  "damask,"  silk  cloth  manufactured  at  Damascus, 
  Amos  3:12.  A.V.,  "in  the  corner  of  a  bed,  and  in  Damascus  in  a 
  couch;"  R.V.,  "in  the  corner  of  a  couch,  and  on  the  silken 
  cushions  of  a  bed"  (marg.,  "in  Damascus  on  a  bed"). 
 
  Heb.  meshi,  (Ezek.  16:10,  13,  rendered  "silk").  In  Gen.  41:42 
  (marg.  A.V.),  Prov.  31:22  (R.V.,  "fine  linen"),  the  word  silk" 
  ought  to  be  "fine  linen." 
 
  Silk  was  common  in  New  Testament  times  (Rev.  18:12). 
 




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