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curl

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curl


  4  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Curl  \Curl\,  v.  i. 
  1.  To  contract  or  bend  into  curls  or  ringlets,  as  hair;  to 
  grow  in  curls  or  spirals,  as  a  vine;  to  be  crinkled  or 
  contorted;  to  have  a  curly  appearance;  as  leaves  lie 
  curled  on  the  ground. 
 
  Thou  seest  it  [hair]  will  not  curl  by  nature. 
  --Shak. 
 
  2.  To  move  in  curves,  spirals,  or  undulations;  to  contract  in 
  curving  outlines;  to  bend  in  a  curved  form  to  make  a  curl 
  or  curls.  ``Cirling  billows.''  --Dryden. 
 
  Then  round  her  slender  waist  he  curled.  --Dryden. 
 
  Curling  smokes  from  village  tops  are  seen.  --Pope. 
 
  Gayly  curl  the  waves  before  each  dashing  prow. 
  --Byron. 
 
  He  smiled  a  king  of  sickly  smile,  and  curled  up  on 
  the  floor.  --Bret  Harte. 
 
  3.  To  play  at  the  game  called  curling.  [Scot.] 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Curl  \Curl\  (k[^u]rl),  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Curled}  (k[^u]rld); 
  p.  pr  &  vb  n.  {Curling}.]  [Akin  to  D.  krullen,  Dan. 
  kr["o]lle,  dial.  Sw  krulla  to  curl,  crisp;  possibly  akin  to 
  E.  crook.  Cf  {Curl},  n.,  {Cruller}.] 
  1.  To  twist  or  form  into  ringlets;  to  crisp,  as  the  hair. 
 
  But  curl  their  locks  with  bodkins  and  with  braid. 
  --Cascoigne. 
 
  2.  To  twist  or  make  onto  coils,  as  a  serpent's  body. 
 
  Of  his  tortuous  train,  Curled  many  a  wanton  wreath 
  in  sight  of  Eve.  --Milton. 
 
  3.  To  deck  with  or  as  with  curls;  to  ornament. 
 
  Thicker  than  the  snaky  locks  That  curledMeg[ae]ra. 
  --Milton. 
 
  Curling  with  metaphors  a  plain  intention.  --Herbert. 
 
  4.  To  raise  in  waves  or  undulations;  to  ripple. 
 
  Seas  would  be  pools  without  the  brushing  air  To  curl 
  the  waves.  --Dryden. 
 
  5.  (Hat  Making)  To  shape  (the  brim)  into  a  curve. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Curl  \Curl\  (k[^u]rl),  n.  [Akin  to  D.  krul,  Dan.  kr["o]lle.  See 
  {Curl},  v.  ] 
  1.  A  ringlet,  especially  of  hair;  anything  of  a  spiral  or 
  winding  form 
 
  Under  a  coronet,  his  flowing  hair  In  curls  on  either 
  cheek  played.  --Milton. 
 
  2.  An  undulating  or  waving  line  or  streak  in  any  substance, 
  as  wood,  glass,  etc.;  flexure;  sinuosity. 
 
  If  the  glass  of  the  prisms  .  .  .  be  without  those 
  numberless  waves  or  curls  which  usually  arise  from 
  the  sand  holes.  --Sir  I. 
  Newton. 
 
  3.  A  disease  in  potatoes,  in  which  the  leaves,  at  their  first 
  appearance,  seem  curled  and  shrunken. 
 
  {Blue  curls}.  (Bot.)  See  under  {Blue}. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  curl 
  n  1:  a  round  shape  formed  by  a  series  of  concentric  circles  [syn: 
  {coil},  {whorl},  {roll},  {curlicue},  {ringlet},  {gyre}, 
  {scroll}] 
  2:  a  strand  or  cluster  of  hair  [syn:  {lock},  {ringlet},  {whorl}] 
  v  1:  form  a  curl,  curve,  or  kink;  "the  cigar  smoke  curled  up  at 
  the  ceiling";  "The  road  curved"  [syn:  {curve},  {kink}] 
  2:  shape  one's  body  into  a  curl;  "She  curled  farther  down  under 
  the  covers"  [syn:  {curl  up}] 
  3:  wind  around  something  in  coils  or  loops  [syn:  {coil},  {loop}] 
  [ant:  {uncoil}] 
  4:  twist  or  roll  into  coils  or  ringlets;  "curl  my  hair,  please" 
  [syn:  {wave}] 




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