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affect

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affect


  4  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Affect  \Af*fect"\  ([a^]f*f[e^]kt"),  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p. 
  {Affected};  p.  pr  &  vb  n.  {Affecting}.]  [L.  affectus  p.  p. 
  of  afficere  to  affect  by  active  agency;  ad  +  facere  to  make: 
  cf  F.  affectere  L.  affectare  freq.  of  afficere  See 
  {Fact}.] 
  1.  To  act  upon  to  produce  an  effect  or  change  upon 
 
  As  might  affect  the  earth  with  cold  heat.  --Milton. 
 
  The  climate  affected  their  health  and  spirits. 
  --Macaulay. 
 
  2.  To  influence  or  move  as  the  feelings  or  passions;  to 
  touch. 
 
  A  consideration  of  the  rationale  of  our  passions 
  seems  to  me  very  necessary  for  all  who  would  affect 
  them  upon  solid  and  pure  principles.  --Burke. 
 
  3.  To  love;  to  regard  with  affection.  [Obs.] 
 
  As  for  Queen  Katharine  he  rather  respected  than 
  affected,  rather  honored  than  loved,  her  --Fuller. 
 
  4.  To  show  a  fondness  for  to  like  to  use  or  practice;  to 
  choose  hence  to  frequent  habitually. 
 
  For  he  does  neither  affect  company,  nor  is  he  fit 
  for  it  indeed.  --Shak. 
 
  Do  not  affect  the  society  of  your  inferiors  in  rank, 
  nor  court  that  of  the  great.  --Hazlitt. 
 
  5.  To  dispose  or  incline. 
 
  Men  whom  they  thought  best  affected  to  religion  and 
  their  country's  liberty.  --Milton. 
 
  6.  To  aim  at  to  aspire;  to  covet.  [Obs.] 
 
  This  proud  man  affects  imperial  ?way.  --Dryden. 
 
  7.  To  tend  to  by  affinity  or  disposition. 
 
  The  drops  of  every  fluid  affect  a  round  figure. 
  --Newton. 
 
  8.  To  make  a  show  of  to  put  on  a  pretense  of  to  feign;  to 
  assume;  as  to  affect  ignorance. 
 
  Careless  she  is  with  artful  care  Affecting  to  seem 
  unaffected.  --Congreve. 
 
  Thou  dost  affect  my  manners.  --Shak. 
 
  9.  To  assign;  to  appoint.  [R.] 
 
  One  of  the  domestics  was  affected  to  his  special 
  service.  --Thackeray. 
 
  Syn:  To  influence;  operate;  act  on  concern;  move  melt; 
  soften;  subdue;  overcome;  pretend;  assume. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Affect  \Af*fect"\,  n.  [L.  affectus.] 
  Affection;  inclination;  passion;  feeling;  disposition.  [Obs.] 
  --Shak. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Affect  \Af*fect"\,  n.  (Psychotherapy) 
  The  emotional  complex  associated  with  an  idea  or  mental 
  state.  In  hysteria,  the  affect  is  sometimes  entirely 
  dissociated,  sometimes  transferred  to  another  than  the 
  original  idea. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  affect 
  n  :  the  conscious  subjective  aspect  of  feeling  or  emotion 
  v  1:  have  an  effect  upon  "Will  the  new  rules  affect  me?"  [syn:  {impact}, 
  {bear  upon},  {bear  on},  {touch  on},  {touch}] 
  2:  act  physically  on  have  an  effect  upon 
  3:  connect  closely  and  often  incriminatingly;  "This  new  ruling 
  affects  your  business"  [syn:  {involve},  {regard}] 
  4:  make  believe;  "He  feigned  that  he  was  ill";  "He  shammed  a 
  headache"  [syn:  {feign},  {sham},  {pretend},  {dissemble}] 
  5:  have  an  emotional  or  cognitive  impact  upon  "This  struck  me 
  as  odd"  [syn:  {impress},  {move},  {strike}] 




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