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pathmore about path

path


  6  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Path  \Path\  (p[.a][th]),  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Pathed} 
  (p[.a][th]d);  pr.p.  &  vb  n.  {Pathing}.] 
  To  make  a  path  in  or  on  (something),  or  for  (some  one).  [R.] 
  ``Pathing  young  Henry's  unadvised  ways.''  --Drayton. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Path  \Path\,  v.  i. 
  To  walk  or  go  [R.]  --Shak. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Path  \Path\  (p[.a]th),  n.;  pl  {Paths}  (p[.a][th]z).  [As. 
  p[ae][eth],  pa[eth];  akin  to  D.  pad,  G.  pfad,  of  uncertain 
  origin;  cf  Gr  pa`tos,  Skr.  patha,  path.  [root]21.] 
  1.  A  trodden  way  a  footway. 
 
  The  dewy  paths  of  meadows  we  will  tread.  --Dryden. 
 
  2.  A  way  course,  or  track,  in  which  anything  moves  or  has 
  moved  route;  passage;  an  established  way  as  the  path  of 
  a  meteor,  of  a  caravan,  of  a  storm,  of  a  pestilence.  Also 
  used  figuratively,  of  a  course  of  life  or  action 
 
  All  the  paths  of  the  Lord  are  mercy  and  truth.  --Ps. 
  xxv.  10. 
 
  The  paths  of  glory  lead  but  to  the  grave.  --Gray. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  path 
  n  1:  a  course  of  conduct;  "the  path  of  virtue";  "we  went  our 
  separate  ways";  "our  paths  in  life  led  us  apart"; 
  "genius  usually  follows  a  revolutionary  path"  [syn:  {way}, 
  {way  of  life}] 
  2:  a  way  especially  designed  for  a  particular  use 
  3:  an  established  line  of  travel  or  access  [syn:  {route}] 
  4:  a  line  or  route  along  which  something  travels  or  moves:  "the 
  hurricane  demolished  houses  in  its  path";  "the  track  of  an 
  animal";  "the  course  of  the  river"  [syn:  {track},  {course}] 
 
  From  Jargon  File  (4.2.3,  23  NOV  2000)  [jargon]: 
 
  path  n.  1.  A  {bang  path}  or  explicitly  routed  {{Internet 
  address}};  a  node-by-node  specification  of  a  link  between  two  machines. 
  Though  these  are  now  obsolete  as  a  form  of  addressing,  they  still  show 
  up  in  diagnostics  and  trace  headers  occasionally  (e.g.  in  NNTP  headers). 
  2.  [Unix]  A  filename  fully  specified  relative  to  the  root  directory 
  (as  opposed  to  relative  to  the  current  directory;  the  latter  is  sometimes 
  called  a  `relative  path').  This  is  also  called  a  `pathname'.  3.  [Unix 
  and  MS-DOS]  The  `search  path',  an  environment  variable  specifying  the 
  directories  in  which  the  {shell}  (COMMAND.COM,  under  MS-DOS)  should 
  look  for  commands.  Other  similar  constructs  abound  under  Unix  (for 
  example,  the  C  preprocessor  has  a  `search  path'  it  uses  in  looking  for 
  `#include'  files). 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  path 
 
  1.    A  {bang  path}  or  explicitly  routed  {Internet 
  address};  a  node-by-node  specification  of  a  link  between  two 
  machines. 
 
  2.    {pathname}. 
 
  3.    The  list  of  directories  the  kernel 
  (under  {Unix})  or  the  command  interpreter  (under  {MS-DOS}) 
  searches  for  {executables}.  It  is  stored  as  part  of  the 
  {environment}  in  both  operating  systems. 
 
  Other  similar  constructs  abound  under  Unix;  the  {C} 
  {preprocessor},  for  example,  uses  such  a  search  path  to  locate 
  "#include"  files. 
 
  [{Jargon  File}] 
 
  (1996-11-21) 
 
 




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