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act

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act


  7  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Act  \Act\,  v.  i. 
  1.  To  exert  power;  to  produce  an  effect;  as  the  stomach  acts 
  upon  food. 
 
  2.  To  perform  actions;  to  fulfill  functions;  to  put  forth 
  energy;  to  move  as  opposed  to  remaining  at  rest;  to  carry 
  into  effect  a  determination  of  the  will 
 
  He  hangs  between,  in  doubt  to  act  or  rest.  --Pope. 
 
  3.  To  behave  or  conduct,  as  in  morals,  private  duties,  or 
  public  offices;  to  bear  or  deport  one's  self  as  we  know 
  not  why  he  has  acted  so 
 
  4.  To  perform  on  the  stage;  to  represent  a  character. 
 
  To  show  the  world  how  Garrick  did  not  act  --Cowper. 
 
  {To  act  as}  or  {for},  to  do  the  work  of  to  serve  as 
 
  {To  act  on},  to  regulate  one's  conduct  according  to 
 
  {To  act  up  to},  to  equal  in  action  to  fulfill  in  practice; 
  as  he  has  acted  up  to  his  engagement  or  his  advantages. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Act  \Act\  ([a^]kt),  n.  [L.  actus,  fr  agere  to  drive,  do:  cf  F. 
  acte.  See  {Agent}.] 
  1.  That  which  is  done  or  doing  the  exercise  of  power,  or  the 
  effect,  of  which  power  exerted  is  the  cause  a 
  performance;  a  deed. 
 
  That  best  portion  of  a  good  man's  life,  His  little, 
  nameless,  unremembered  acts  Of  kindness  and  of  love. 
  --Wordsworth. 
  Hence  in  specific  uses: 
  a  The  result  of  public  deliberation;  the  decision  or 
  determination  of  a  legislative  body,  council,  court  of 
  justice,  etc.;  a  decree,  edit,  law,  judgment,  resolve, 
  award;  as  an  act  of  Parliament,  or  of  Congress. 
  b  A  formal  solemn  writing,  expressing  that  something  has 
  been  done  --Abbott. 
  c  A  performance  of  part  of  a  play;  one  of  the  principal 
  divisions  of  a  play  or  dramatic  work  in  which  a 
  certain  definite  part  of  the  action  is  completed. 
  d  A  thesis  maintained  in  public,  in  some  English 
  universities,  by  a  candidate  for  a  degree,  or  to  show 
  the  proficiency  of  a  student. 
 
  2.  A  state  of  reality  or  real  existence  as  opposed  to  a 
  possibility  or  possible  existence.  [Obs.] 
 
  The  seeds  of  plants  are  not  at  first  in  act  but  in 
  possibility,  what  they  afterward  grow  to  be 
  --Hooker. 
 
  3.  Process  of  doing  action  In  act  in  the  very  doing  on 
  the  point  of  (doing).  ``In  act  to  shoot.''  --Dryden. 
 
  This  woman  was  taken  .  .  .  in  the  very  act  --John 
  viii.  4. 
 
  {Act  of  attainder}.  (Law)  See  {Attainder}. 
 
  {Act  of  bankruptcy}  (Law),  an  act  of  a  debtor  which  renders 
  him  liable  to  be  adjudged  a  bankrupt. 
 
  {Act  of  faith}.  (Ch.  Hist.)  See  {Auto-da-F['e]}. 
 
  {Act  of  God}  (Law),  an  inevitable  accident;  such 
  extraordinary  interruption  of  the  usual  course  of  events 
  as  is  not  to  be  looked  for  in  advance,  and  against  which 
  ordinary  prudence  could  not  guard. 
 
  {Act  of  grace},  an  expression  often  used  to  designate  an  act 
  declaring  pardon  or  amnesty  to  numerous  offenders,  as  at 
  the  beginning  of  a  new  reign. 
 
  {Act  of  indemnity},  a  statute  passed  for  the  protection  of 
  those  who  have  committed  some  illegal  act  subjecting  them 
  to  penalties.  --Abbott. 
 
  {Act  in  pais},  a  thing  done  out  of  court  (anciently,  in  the 
  country),  and  not  a  matter  of  record. 
 
  Syn:  See  {Action}. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Act  \Act\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Acted};  p.  pr  &  vb  n. 
  {Acting}.]  [L.  actus,  p.  p.  of  agere  to  drive,  lead,  do  but 
  influenced  by  E.  act  n.] 
  1.  To  move  to  action  to  actuate;  to  animate.  [Obs.] 
 
  Self-love,  the  spring  of  motion,  acts  the  soul. 
  --Pope. 
 
  2.  To  perform;  to  execute;  to  do  [Archaic] 
 
  That  we  act  our  temporal  affairs  with  a  desire  no 
  greater  than  our  necessity.  --Jer.  Taylor. 
 
  Industry  doth  beget  by  producing  good  habits,  and 
  facility  of  acting  things  expedient  for  us  to  do 
  --Barrow. 
 
  Uplifted  hands  that  at  convenient  times  Could  act 
  extortion  and  the  worst  of  crimes.  --Cowper. 
 
  3.  To  perform,  as  an  actor;  to  represent  dramatically  on  the 
  stage. 
 
  4.  To  assume  the  office  or  character  of  to  play;  to 
  personate;  as  to  act  the  hero. 
 
  5.  To  feign  or  counterfeit;  to  simulate. 
 
  With  acted  fear  the  villain  thus  pursued.  --Dryden. 
 
  {To  act  a  part},  to  sustain  the  part  of  one  of  the  characters 
  in  a  play;  hence  to  simulate;  to  dissemble. 
 
  {To  act  the  part  of},  to  take  the  character  of  to  fulfill 
  the  duties  of 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  act 
  n  1:  a  legal  document  codifying  the  result  of  deliberations  of  a 
  committee  or  society  or  legislative  body  [syn:  {enactment}] 
  2:  something  that  people  do  or  cause  to  happen  [syn:  {human 
  action},  {human  activity}] 
  3:  a  subdivision  of  a  play  or  opera  or  ballet 
  4:  a  short  theatrical  performance  that  is  part  of  a  longer 
  program;  "he  did  his  act  three  times  every  evening";  "she 
  had  a  catchy  little  routine";  "it  was  one  of  the  best 
  numbers  he  ever  did"  [syn:  {routine},  {number},  {turn},  {bit}] 
  5:  a  manifestation  of  insincerity;  "he  put  on  quite  an  act  for 
  her  benefit" 
  6:  the  performance  of  some  composite  cognitive  activity;  an 
  operation  that  affects  mental  contents;  "the  process  of 
  thinking";  "the  act  of  remembering"  [syn:  {process},  {cognitive 
  process},  {operation},  {cognitive  operation}] 
  v  1:  perform  an  action  "think  before  you  act";  "We  must  move 
  quickly"  [syn:  {move}]  [ant:  {refrain}] 
  2:  behave  in  a  certain  manner;  show  a  certain  behavior;  conduct 
  or  comport  oneself;  "You  should  act  like  an  adult";  "Don't 
  behave  like  a  fool";  "What  makes  her  do  this  way?"  [syn:  {behave}, 
  {do}] 
  3:  play  a  role  or  part  "Gielgud  played  Hamlet";  "She  wants  to 
  act  Lady  Macbeth  but  she  is  too  young  for  the  role"  [syn: 
  {play},  {represent}] 
  4:  discharge  one's  duties;  "She  acts  as  the  chair";  "In  what 
  capacity  are  you  acting?" 
  5:  pretend  to  have  certain  qualities  or  state  of  mind;  "He 
  acted  the  idiot";  "She  plays  deaf  when  the  news  are  bad" 
  [syn:  {play},  {act  as}] 
  6:  be  suitable  for  theatrical  performance:  "This  scene  acts 
  well" 
  7:  have  a  desired  effect;  do  the  trick;  "This  method  doesn't 
  work";  "The  breaks  of  my  new  car  act  quickly"  [syn:  {work}] 
  8:  behave  unnaturally  or  affectedly;  "She's  just  acting"  [syn: 
  {dissemble},  {pretend}] 
  9:  perform  on  a  stage  or  theater;  "She  acts  in  this  play";  "He 
  acted  in  "Julius  Caesar";  "I  played  in  "A  Christmas  Carol" 
  [syn:  {play},  {roleplay},  {playact}] 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  ACT 
 
  1.    {Annual  Change  Traffic}. 
 
  2.    {Ada  Core  Technologies}. 
 
  (1999-06-24) 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  ACT++ 
 
    A  {concurrent}  extension  of  {C++}  based  on 
  {actors}. 
 
  ["ACT++:  Building  a  Concurrent  C++  With  Actors",  D.G.  Kafura 
  TR89-18,  VPI,  1989]. 
 
  (1994-11-08) 
 
 
 
  From  V.E.R.A.  --  Virtual  Entity  of  Relevant  Acronyms  13  March  2001  [vera]: 
 
  ACT 
  Architecture  Characterization  Template  (DISA) 
 
 




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