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justice

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justice


  6  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Justice  \Jus"tice\,  n.  [F.,  fr  L.  justitia  fr  justus  just 
  See  {Just},  a.] 
  1.  The  quality  of  being  just  conformity  to  the  principles  of 
  righteousness  and  rectitude  in  all  things  strict 
  performance  of  moral  obligations;  practical  conformity  to 
  human  or  divine  law;  integrity  in  the  dealings  of  men  with 
  each  other  rectitude;  equity;  uprightness. 
 
  Justice  and  judgment  are  the  haditation  of  thy 
  throne.  --  Ps  ixxxix 
  11. 
 
  The  king-becoming  graces,  As  justice,  verity, 
  temperance,  stableness,  .  .  .  I  have  no  relish  of 
  them  --  Shak. 
 
  2.  Conformity  to  truth  and  reality  in  expressing  opinions  and 
  in  conduct;  fair  representation  of  facts  respecting  merit 
  or  demerit;  honesty;  fidelity;  impartiality;  as  the 
  justice  of  a  description  or  of  a  judgment;  historical 
  justice. 
 
  3.  The  rendering  to  every  one  his  due  or  right  just 
  treatment;  requital  of  desert;  merited  reward  or 
  punishment;  that  which  is  due  to  one's  conduct  or  motives. 
 
  This  even-handed  justice  Commends  the  ingredients  of 
  our  poisoned  chalice  To  our  own  lips.  --  Shak. 
 
  4.  Agreeableness  to  right  equity;  justness;  as  the  justice 
  of  a  claim. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Justice  \Jus"tice\,  v.  t. 
  To  administer  justice  to  [Obs.]  --Bacon. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  justice 
  n  1:  the  quality  of  being  just  or  fair  [syn:  {justness}]  [ant:  {injustice}] 
  2:  the  administration  of  law;  the  act  of  determining  rights  and 
  assigning  rewards  or  punishments;  "justice  deferred  is 
  justice  denied"  [syn:  {judicature}] 
  3:  a  public  official  authorized  to  decide  questions  bought 
  before  a  court  of  justice  [syn:  {judge},  {jurist},  {magistrate}] 
  4:  the  federal  department  responsible  for  enforcing  federal 
  laws  (including  the  enforcement  of  all  civil  rights 
  legislation);  created  in  1870  [syn:  {Department  of  Justice}, 
  {Justice  Department},  {Justice}] 
 
  From  U.S.  Gazetteer  (1990)  [gazetteer]: 
 
  Justice,  IL  (village,  FIPS  38830) 
  Location:  41.74640  N,  87.83552  W 
  Population  (1990):  11137  (4390  housing  units) 
  Area:  7.4  sq  km  (land),  0.1  sq  km  (water) 
  Zip  code(s):  60458 
 
  From  Easton's  1897  Bible  Dictionary  [easton]: 
 
  Justice 
  is  rendering  to  every  one  that  which  is  his  due.  It  has  been 
  distinguished  from  equity  in  this  respect,  that  while  justice 
  means  merely  the  doing  what  positive  law  demands,  equity  means 
  the  doing  of  what  is  fair  and  right  in  every  separate  case. 
 
 
  From  THE  DEVIL'S  DICTIONARY  ((C)1911  Released  April  15  1993)  [devils]: 
 
  JUSTICE,  n.  A  commodity  which  is  a  more  or  less  adulterated  condition 
  the  State  sells  to  the  citizen  as  a  reward  for  his  allegiance,  taxes 
  and  personal  service. 
 
 
  K 
 
 
 
  K  is  a  consonant  that  we  get  from  the  Greeks,  but  it  can  be  traced 
  away  back  beyond  them  to  the  Cerathians  a  small  commercial  nation 
  inhabiting  the  peninsula  of  Smero.  In  their  tongue  it  was  called 
  _Klatch_,  which  means  "destroyed."  The  form  of  the  letter  was 
  originally  precisely  that  of  our  H,  but  the  erudite  Dr  Snedeker 
  explains  that  it  was  altered  to  its  present  shape  to  commemorate  the 
  destruction  of  the  great  temple  of  Jarute  by  an  earthquake,  _circa_ 
  730  B.C.  This  building  was  famous  for  the  two  lofty  columns  of  its 
  portico,  one  of  which  was  broken  in  half  by  the  catastrophe,  the  other 
  remaining  intact.  As  the  earlier  form  of  the  letter  is  supposed  to 
  have  been  suggested  by  these  pillars,  so  it  is  thought  by  the  great 
  antiquary,  its  later  was  adopted  as  a  simple  and  natural  --  not  to  say 
  touching  --  means  of  keeping  the  calamity  ever  in  the  national  memory. 
  It  is  not  known  if  the  name  of  the  letter  was  altered  as  an  additional 
  mnemonic,  or  if  the  name  was  always  _Klatch_  and  the  destruction  one 
  of  nature's  pums.  As  each  theory  seems  probable  enough,  I  see  no 
  objection  to  believing  both  --  and  Dr  Snedeker  arrayed  himself  on 
  that  side  of  the  question. 
 
 




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