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constructive

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constructive


  3  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Constructive  \Con*struct"ive\,  a.  [Cf.  F.  constructif.] 
  1.  Having  ability  to  construct  or  form  employed  in 
  construction;  as  to  exhibit  constructive  power. 
 
  The  constructive  fingers  of  Watts.  --Emerson. 
 
  2.  Derived  from  or  depending  on  construction  or 
  interpretation;  not  directly  expressed,  but  inferred. 
 
  {Constructive  crimes}  (Law),  acts  having  effects  analogous  to 
  those  of  some  statutory  or  common  law  crimes;  as 
  constructive  treason.  Constructive  crimes  are  no  longer 
  recognized  by  the  courts. 
 
  {Constructive  notice},  notice  imputed  by  construction  of  law. 
 
 
  {Constructive  trust},  a  trust  which  may  be  assumed  to  exist, 
  though  no  actual  mention  of  it  be  made 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  constructive 
  adj  1:  constructing  or  tending  to  construct  or  improve  or  promote 
  development;  "constructive  criticism";  "a  constructive 
  attitude";  "a  constructive  philosophy";  "constructive 
  permission"  [ant:  {destructive}] 
  2:  emphasizing  what  is  laudable  or  hopeful  or  to  the  good; 
  "constructive  criticism" 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  constructive 
 
    A  proof  that  something  exists  is  constructive" 
  if  it  provides  a  method  for  actually  constructing  it 
  {Cantor}'s  proof  that  the  {real  number}s  are  {uncountable}  can 
  be  thought  of  as  a  *non-constructive*  proof  that  {irrational 
  number}s  exist.  (There  are  easy  constructive  proofs,  too  but 
  there  are  existence  theorems  with  no  known  constructive 
  proof). 
 
  Obviously,  all  else  being  equal,  constructive  proofs  are 
  better  than  non-constructive  proofs.  A  few  mathematicians 
  actually  reject  *all*  non-constructive  arguments  as  invalid; 
  this  means  for  instance,  that  the  law  of  the  {excluded 
  middle}  (either  P  or  not-P  must  hold  whatever  P  is)  has  to 
  go  this  makes  proof  by  contradiction  invalid.  See 
  {intuitionistic  logic}  for  more  information  on  this 
 
  Most  mathematicians  are  perfectly  happy  with  non-constructive 
  proofs;  however,  the  constructive  approach  is  popular  in 
  theoretical  computer  science,  both  because  computer  scientists 
  are  less  given  to  abstraction  than  mathematicians  and  because 
  {intuitionistic  logic}  turns  out  to  be  the  right  theory  for  a 
  theoretical  treatment  of  the  foundations  of  computer  science. 
 
  (1995-04-13) 
 
 




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