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likingmore about liking

liking


  4  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Like  \Like\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Liked}  (l[imac]kt);  p.  pr  & 
  vb  n.  {Liking}.]  [OE.  liken  to  please,  AS  l[=i]cian, 
  gel[=i]cian,  fr  gel[=i]c.  See  {Like},  a.] 
  1.  To  suit;  to  please;  to  be  agreeable  to  [Obs.] 
 
  Cornwall  him  liked  best,  therefore  he  chose  there 
  --R.  of 
  Gloucester. 
 
  I  willingly  confess  that  it  likes  me  much  better 
  when  I  find  virtue  in  a  fair  lodging  than  when  I  am 
  bound  to  seek  it  in  an  ill-favored  creature.  --Sir 
  P.  Sidney. 
 
  2.  To  be  pleased  with  in  a  moderate  degree;  to  approve;  to 
  take  satisfaction  in  to  enjoy. 
 
  He  proceeded  from  looking  to  liking,  and  from  liking 
  to  loving.  --Sir  P. 
  Sidney. 
 
  3.  To  liken;  to  compare.[Obs.] 
 
  Like  me  to  the  peasant  boys  of  France.  --Shak. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Liking  \Lik"ing\  (l[imac]k"[i^]ng),  p.  a. 
  Looking;  appearing;  as  better  or  worse  liking.  See  {Like}, 
  to  look  [Obs.]  --Chaucer. 
 
  Why  should  he  see  your  faces  worse  liking  than  the 
  children  which  are  of  your  sort  ?  --Dan.  i.  10. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Liking  \Lik"ing\,  n. 
  1.  The  state  of  being  pleasing;  a  suiting.  See  {On  liking}, 
  below.  [Obs.  or  Prov.  Eng.] 
 
  2.  The  state  of  being  pleased  with  or  attracted  toward,  some 
  thing  or  person;  hence  inclination;  desire;  pleasure; 
  preference;  --  often  with  for  formerly  with  to  as  it  is 
  an  amusement  I  have  no  liking  for 
 
  If  the  human  intellect  hath  once  taken  a  liking  to 
  any  doctrine,  .  .  .  it  draws  everything  else  into 
  harmony  with  that  doctrine,  and  to  its  support. 
  --Bacon. 
 
  3.  Appearance;  look  figure;  state  of  body  as  to  health  or 
  condition.  [Archaic] 
 
  I  shall  think  the  worse  of  fat  men,  as  long  as  I 
  have  an  eye  to  make  difference  of  men's  liking. 
  --Shak. 
 
  Their  young  ones  are  in  good  liking.  --Job.  xxxix 
  4. 
 
  {On  liking},  on  condition  of  being  pleasing  to  or  suiting; 
  also  on  condition  of  being  pleased  with  as  to  hold  a 
  place  of  service  on  liking;  to  engage  a  servant  on  liking. 
  [Obs.  or  Prov.  Eng.] 
 
  Would  he  be  the  degenerate  scion  of  that  royal  line 
  .  .  .  to  be  a  king  on  liking  and  on  sufferance  ? 
  --Hazlitt. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  liking 
  n  :  a  feeling  of  pleasure  and  enjoyment;  "I've  always  had  a 
  liking  for  reading";  "she  developed  a  liking  for  gin" 
  [ant:  {dislike}] 




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